Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Simone: Hey everyone, this is Absolute Beginner, season 1, lesson 8 Let's All Go to the Hungarian Movies
Gergo: Sziasztok, I am Gergo.
Simone: In this lesson, you are going to learn some numbers to understand prices better.
Gergo: The conversation takes place at the ticket booth by the movie theater.
Simone: Anne is asking for tickets from the clerk.
Gergo: Which means that they are going to use the polite forms where necessary.

Lesson conversation

Clerk Tessék...
Anne Két jegyet kérek a filmre.
Clerk Kétezer-ötszáz forint. Hova kéri?
Anne Hatodik sor.
Clerk Még valamit?
Anne Egy kukoricát kérek.
Clerk Háromezer forint.
Let’s listen to the conversation one time slowly.(English)
Clerk Tessék...
Anne Két jegyet kérek a filmre.
Clerk Kétezer-ötszáz forint. Hova kéri?
Anne Hatodik sor.
Clerk Még valamit?
Anne Egy kukoricát kérek.
Clerk Háromezer forint.
Let’s listen to the conversation with English translation (English)
Clerk Tessék...
Simone: Can I help you?
Anne Két jegyet kérek a filmre.
Simone: Two tickets to Inception, please.
Clerk Kétezer-ötszáz forint. Hova kéri?
Simone: 2500 forints. Which seat?
Anne Hatodik sor.
Simone: Sixth row.
Clerk Még valamit?
Simone: Anything else?
Anne Egy kukoricát kérek.
Simone: I'd like a bag of popcorn.
Clerk Háromezer forint.
Simone: 3000 forints.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Simone: 3000 forints huh? Is that a lot of money?
Gergo: About 15 bucks.
Simone: Aren’t you supposed to have euros already?
Gergo: Yep. It seems it is going to take longer than expected. Right now, I think they estimate 2015 to be the year when we make the conversion.
Simone: I guess the whole financial crisis didn’t help things along either...
Gergo: Not at all. The inflation works against us too. It was only a little while ago that we stopped using the 1 and 2 forint coins, since they were more expensive to manufacture than what they were worth.
Simone: I’ve noticed that, they are just rounding up or down to the nearest ten or five now.
Gergo: Right. Don’t let them surprise you with that.
Simone: Shall we talk some vocab now?
Gergo: Sure, let’s do it.
VOCAB LIST
Simone: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Gergo: két [natural native speed]
Simone: two
Gergo: két [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: két [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: jegy [natural native speed]
Simone: ticket
Gergo: jegy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: jegy [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: film [natural native speed]
Simone: movie
Gergo: film [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: film [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: kétezer-ötszáz [natural native speed]
Simone: 2500
Gergo: kétezer-ötszáz [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: kétezer-ötszáz [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: háromezer [natural native speed]
Simone: 3000
Gergo: háromezer [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: háromezer [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: forint [natural native speed]
Simone: forint
Gergo: forint [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: forint [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: hova? [natural native speed]
Simone: where to
Gergo: hova? [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: hova? [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: hatodik [natural native speed]
Simone: sixth
Gergo: hatodik [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: hatodik [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: sor [natural native speed]
Simone: row
Gergo: sor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: sor [natural native speed]
Next is
Gergo: kukorica [natural native speed]
Simone: popcorn/corn
Gergo: kukorica [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gergo: kukorica [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Simone: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. Care to explain some of them?
Gergo: No problem. The first sentence we’re going to talk about is hová kéri.
Simone: What does that mean literally?
Gergo: It means “where would you like it?” You may actually hear it outside the movie theater too, from a cabbie maybe.
Simone: We have spent long minutes with the word kéri. It means “you’d like” in polite speech.
Gergo: Oh, so you are actually doing these shows awake?
Simone: Ha-ha. You were explaining....
Gergo: Hova, or sometimes pronounced hová means “where to?”
Simone: And she wanted to sit in the sixth row, or
Gergo: A hatodik sorba. Hatodik is an ordinal number, it means “sixth.”
Simone: Whereas “six” is...
Gergo: Hat. We’ll get into this in a minute. But before that, we’re going to talk popcorn.
Simone: Ku...kori...ca...
Gergo: See, that’s why I brought it up. I bet you remember this whole accusative thing. Here, “popcorn” is in the accusative, if you just look it up in the dictionary, you will find kukorica.
Simone: Kukorica – nominative, kukoricát – accusative. Accusative means that it is in the object position, right?
Gergo: Right. The same is true to jegyet. This means “ticket,” but since she asks for a ticket, it is an object and in the accusative.
Simone: The nominative is jegy, right?
Gergo: Good job. Jegy. I promise we’ll talk about this later more.
Simone: (sarcastically) I can hardly wait. But now, let’s turn our attention to grammar.

Lesson focus

Gergo: Well, there isn’t much to explain about this lesson’s grammar point. Numbers.
Simone: To be honest, I have always been terrible at these. In any language.
Gergo: This is not the positive energy we’re here for, you know.
Simone: Just being honest. Anyway, we decided that when talking about numbers and prices, we’ll start by teaching hundreds and thousands, since those are the prices you’ll hear most often.
Gergo: Unfortunately it is true. You’ll rarely go under those in stores now.
Simone: So shall we get on with the numbers, firstly, one to ten.
Gergo: Egy.
Simone: “One.”
Gergo: Kettő.
Simone: “Two.”
Gergo: Három.
Simone: “Three.”
Gergo: Négy.
Simone: “Four.”
Gergo: Öt.
Simone: “Five.”
Gergo: Hat.
Simone: “Six.”
Gergo: Hét.
Simone: “Seven.”
Gergo: Nyolc.
Simone: “Eight.”
*. Kilenc.
Simone: “Nine.”
Gergo: Tíz.
Simone: “Ten.”
Gergo: And there we are.
Simone: I think that in the lesson he said three thousand.
Gergo: Which is very easily done, once you know the numbers from one to ten. “Thousand” in Hungarian is ezer. So 3000 is háromezer.
Simone: How about hundred then?
Gergo: “Hundred” - száz. “Thousand” - ezer. Listeners, let’s say: Kilencezer-hatszáz túl sok!
Simone: “9600 is too much!” Useful when bargaining. Now say: “the book costs 2300 forints.”
Gergo: Which is about right for English language publications. Listen and repeat: A könyv kétezer-háromszáz forint.
Simone: One thing though. We’ve heard you teach “two” as kettő. But I also remember hearing két.
*. Both of these mean “two”, but normally you say két - something, not kettő - something.
Simone: And if I mix it up?
Gergo: Not really a problem. If you use kettő and say “2200” like kettőezer-kettőszáz, it sounds like you really wanted to sound precise and you really want to avoid being misheard.
Simone: All right. All these numbers in this lesson, my goodness.
*. I know, but you and all of the listeners have to get through them at some point. Sorry.
Simone: Well, I know. So that’s it from us in lesson nyo...nyo...
Gergo: nyolc
Simone: Lesson nyolc, and see you next time.
Gergo: Sziasztok.

15 Comments

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HungarianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:30 PM
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What do you like to eat while watching movies?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:39 PM
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Szia Jessica!


In the sentence "Álljon be a sorba!" there is no object, so indefinite form should be used.


"megy" is also a special case. (there is no object) There is no definite form of this word. "megyek" is correct.


(It is very simple: you cannot go or stand something)


Zsuzsanna

Team HungarianPod101.com

Jessica
Friday at 12:05 AM
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Nem megyek a filmre. "I'm not going to the movie."

whey it doesn't use megyem ?

Jessica
Thursday at 08:30 PM
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Álljon be a sorba!

why doesn't use Állja for Álljon ?

as this is definite not indefinite Object.

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:11 PM
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Hi Laura!

Literally "Két autóm van." means "There are two cars of mine." (which means "I have two cars.")

The form of verb 'to be' refers to the cars, not to the owner of the cars.

There is a rule which says, that if you define the quantity, in Hungarian you don't pluralize the noun. (autóm)

That's why we have to use singular form of the verb 'to be", which is "van".


I hope I could help!


Zsuzsanna

Team HungarianPod101.com

Laura Perez
Thursday at 11:21 AM
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Hi, so I have one doubt "Két autóm van" means "I have two cars". I thought that "van" was the verb to be and for I it was "vagyok". Van is a form of conjugate "have" for I? Or what is going on there?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:10 PM
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Hi Nemanja!


No problem!


Let me know if something else comes up.


Csaba

Team HungarianPod101.com:thumbsup:

Nemanja
Wednesday at 06:02 AM
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Hi Csaba,


Thanks a lot for the detailed explanation.


Best regards


Nemanja

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:32 AM
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Hi Nemanja!


Well, this is hard to explain in the level of grammatical rules and the difference is really in just the habits/preference of speakers, maybe the communicative situation. Both of the words mean "who," no difference in meaning.


Kicsoda to most Hungarians carries a more urgent/suprised/puzzled tone.


Ez KICSODA?

"Who the heck is this?"


Indeed, the etymology of the word itself is most probably related to ki a csoda, or "who the heck?" (In Hungarian csoda is "miracle")


Ki a csoda az Bruce Willis?

"Who the heck is Bruce Willis?"


However kicsoda is less motivated and can be simply used as "who."


Az ki?

"Who is that?"


I hope I helped a bit! In most cases it is interchangeable with ki?.


Csaba

Team HungarianPod101.com:thumbsup:

Nemanja
Saturday at 12:01 AM
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Hi


What is the difference between kicsoda and ki?


Thanks


Nemanja

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 02:02 AM
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Hi Alexander!


You can point at the seat and say:

Parancsoljon!

This is a polite way to offer your seat.


You can also say:

Tessék!


Both of these expressions mean something like "please".


Csaba

Team HungarianPod101.com