Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

 INTRODUCTION
Simone: Hi everyone and welcome to Upper Beginner Hungarian, season 1, lesson 12. Perfect your Hungarian Prefixes. I am Simone.
Csaba: And I am Csaba.
Simone: In this lesson we’re going to learn about prefixes.
Csaba: The conversation takes place at school.
Simone: The conversation is between Susan and a student.
Csaba: Susan uses the informal language.
Simone: Let’s listen to it now.
DIALOGUE
Diák: Tanárnő, kiszaladok pisilni.
Susan: Rendben, menj csak. Kinyitom az ajtót.
Diák: Pár perc múlva visszajövök.
Susan: Többiek, becsukjuk a könyvet és elénekeljük az abc-dalt. Mindenki megtanulta?
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Diák: Tanárnő, kiszaladok pisilni.
Susan: Rendben, menj csak. Kinyitom az ajtót.
Diák: Pár perc múlva visszajövök.
Susan: Többiek, becsukjuk a könyvet és elénekeljük az abc-dalt. Mindenki megtanulta?
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Diák: Tanárnő, kiszaladok pisilni.
Simone: Miss, I'll run out to pee.
Susan: Rendben, menj csak. Kinyitom az ajtót.
Simone: Alright, go ahead. I'll open the door.
Diák: Pár perc múlva visszajövök.
Simone: I'll be back in a few minutes.
Susan: Többiek, becsukjuk a könyvet és elénekeljük az abc-dalt. Mindenki megtanulta?
Simone: Others, please close the book and we'll sing the ABC song. Did everyone study it?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Csaba: Listeners, we recommend avoiding public restrooms at subways and train stations. Not only are they in a bad state, but a lot of suspicious elements hang around the small pubs nearby.
Simone: I’m not entirely happy with the idea of those underground passes either. They are never clean enough. And the public bathroom situation is not something be proud of in Hungary.
Csaba: The best solution is keeping track of McDonald’s and KFCs on the road, even if it means you have to buy a coke to be allowed to use the restroom.
Simone: Right. Also, have we mentioned how to say toilet paper?
Csaba: I don’t know, but here it is
Simone: Note to self
VOCAB LIST
Simone: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Csaba: szalad [natural native speed]
Simone: run
Csaba: szalad [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: szalad [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: pisil [natural native speed]
Simone: pee
Csaba: pisil [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: pisil [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: ki- [natural native speed]
Simone: out
Csaba: ki- [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: ki- [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: be- [natural native speed]
Simone: in
Csaba: be- [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: be- [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: vissza- [natural native speed]
Simone: back
Csaba: vissza- [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: vissza- [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: el- [natural native speed]
Simone: away
Csaba: el- [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: el- [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: meg- [natural native speed]
Simone: finish
Csaba: meg- [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: meg- [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: többiek [natural native speed]
Simone: others
Csaba: többiek [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: többiek [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: csuk [natural native speed]
Simone: close
Csaba: csuk [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: csuk [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: énekel [natural native speed]
Simone: sing
Csaba: énekel [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: énekel [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: dal [natural native speed]
Simone: song
Csaba: dal [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: dal [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: ABC (ábécé) [natural native speed]
Simone: the alphabet
Csaba: ABC (ábécé) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: ABC (ábécé) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Simone: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Csaba: The first word we learn is pisilni or “to pee.”
Simone: Can you put it in a sentence?
Csaba: Kimegyek pisilni.
Simone: “I'm going out to pee.”
Csaba: Kimegyek pisilni. This is perfectly fine to say for girls and kids, but guys don’t use it very often. It carries a cute overtone that fellows don’t say.
Simone: So what do guys say?
Csaba: Well, you can always say Kimegyek a mosdóba.
Simone: “I'm going out to the bathroom.”
Csaba: Kimegyek a mosdóba. This is polite and easy to use. On the other hand, you may not want to be very specific and just say “excuse me” or elnézést when standing up from the table.
Simone: All right, what is the next expression.
Csaba: Tanárnő is the normal way to address female teachers of any age and school. Tanár úr is the male equivalent.
Simone: Use it in a sentence, please.
Csaba: Tanárnő, van egy kérdésem.
Simone: “Miss, I have a question.”
Csaba: Tanárnő, van egy kérdésem.
Simone: And what is the final item on the vocab list?
Csaba: Többiek means “the others.” In this dialogue, Susan uses it to address the rest of the student who didn't go out to the bathroom.
Simone: Let’s give the listeners another example.
Csaba: Többiek, ti mit mondtok?
Simone: “Others, what do you say?”
Csaba: Többiek, ti mit mondtok?
Simone: All right, let’s see those prefixes in the grammar section.
Csaba: Let’s do that.

Lesson focus

Simone: In this lesson we’re going to discuss prefixes.
Csaba: We have already touched upon them before and learned a couple of examples here and there. In this lesson we’re going to give you a more systematic approach and in the next lesson we’re going to look at their peculiarities in connection with word order.
Simone: What is the first sentence?
Csaba: We had two words from the student that are prefixed. The first one is kiszaladok
Simone: “I run out.”
Csaba: Kiszaladok. This is the first person singular szaladok, or “I run” and the prefix ki-. This prefix means “out.”
Simone: And the full sentence was...?
Csaba: Kiszaladok pisilni.
Simone: “I’ll run out to pee.”
Csaba: In this sentence the prefix signifies a direction, the direction of the action, “running.” This is one of the functions of prefixes – provide information on the direction of the verb. Another similar sentence was
Simone: “I'll come back in a few minutes.”
Csaba: Pár perc múlva visszajövök. Visszajövök. Vissza means “back.” Again, the direction of the verb.
Simone: Now, besides the direction, what other uses are there?
Csaba: Sometimes the prefix lays emphasis on the result, the completion of the action. One example from the text is Elénekeljük az ábécé dalt.
Simone: “We'll sing the ABC song.”
Csaba: Elénekeljük az ábécé dalt. Elénekeljük. Now the prefix el- often means “away,” a direction. But with certain verbs like sing, it means “sing from the beginning to the end, with concentration. Just like schoolkids.
Simone: This is a bit harder to get, I think.
Csaba: Let’s look at another example then. Tanul is “learn.” Megtanul means “really learn well and actually know it later.”
Simone: Can you give an example?
Csaba: Megtanulok spanyolul.
Simone: “I'll learn Spanish.” (and by this time next year, I will have learned it)
Csaba: Without the prefix
Simone: “I'm learning Spanish.”
Csaba: just like in the above two examples, this difference is translated into two different English tenses.
Simone: So the two prefixes, el- and meg- can carry the meaning of completion.
Csaba: As well as other prefixes. The trick is to learn which one to use and how it changes the meaning of the base verb. Sometimes the prefix changes he meaning so much, that it is actually in the dictionary as a new entry.
Simone: Have we mentioned that we also provide more examples in the PDF guide?
Csaba: Now we have. Until next time, sziasztok!
Simone: Bye!

Outro

Simone: That just about does it for today.
Csaba: Premium members, get all the lessons or just the lessons you want with My Feed.
Simone: My Feed is a powerful tool that delivers lessons and materials you want, right to your computer.
Csaba: Choose your level and the lessons you want at HungarianPod101.com.
Simone: A personalized profile created, and you can download ALL the lessons with a click of the button.
Csaba: This is a great way to customize your language learning experience.
Simone: So that you can just focus on mastering Hungarian!
Csaba: Go to HungarianPod101.com to setup your customized My Feed today!

10 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi everyone!

How about coming with some examples for this lesson?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:50 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Szia gabor!


Almost perfect! 😇

We cross the railroad tracks. = Átmegyünk a vágányokon. ("vágány" = a railroad track, "vágányok" = railroad tracks, "a vágányok" = the railroad tracks, "a vágányokon" = on the railroad tracks)


We express going through something as "going ON through it". And it's intuitive to think that, when you go through something, you actually step right on it first, to then be able to move beyond it. That's why, instead of saying: "Átmegyünk a vágányok.", in correct Hungarian, we say: "Átmegyünk a vágányokon." (literally: We go/walk through on the railroad tracks.)


Regarding the tram stop, you could say "villamosállomás" and it would be perfectly understood - but generally speaking, an "állomás" is a bigger place with a building. We normally call tram stops (and bus stops too for that matter) as villamos-megállóhely (buszmegállóhely). Seems intimidating? Don't worry, let's break it up to parts: villamos = tram (busz = bus), megáll = to stop, hely = place --> megállóhely = stopping place.


By the way, do you know which public transport will generally have an "állomás" and not just a "megállóhely"? The trains! A vonat! Since train stations are real stations with a proper building with waiting hall, ticket office, toilets, even service flats etc.


Levente

Team HungarianPod101.com

gabor
Saturday at 06:54 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

megaltam a villamos...allomas?


Atmegyjunk a vagany. Do not know for sure. Trying to say we cross the railroad tracks.

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:38 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Szia Richárd!


Igen, tökéletes! Egy pohár Tokaji jól esne! 😎


Kellemes napot!

Dorottya

Team HungarianPod101.com

Richard Lazar
Saturday at 08:44 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Szia Dorottya! Egy száraz fehérbor jól lesz, mit szólsz?

Üdv

Richárd

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 01:11 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Szia Richárd!


Én is nagyon örülök, hogy megismertelek! Engem Dorottyának hívnak.


Jók a példamondatok! Mit iszunk?😆


Best,

Dorottya

Team HungarianPod101.com

Richard Lazar
Monday at 07:55 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Akarok megtanulni magyarul. Akkor nagyon örülök hogy megismertelek!

Richard Lazar
Monday at 06:01 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Kimegyek a kertbe. Áthozod a piát? Szép idö van.

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 03:32 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Stephen!


This is a really good observation and it speaks of advanced grammar use.


Sometimes Hungarian people will omit the accusative ending from a noun which is in the possessive (in first and second person). Your examples are perfectly fine too, both forms are correct.:smile:


Hajrá!


Csaba

Team HungarianPod101.com

Stephen Kristan
Tuesday at 10:56 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

In these sentences:


Visszahoztam a tollad.

Megkeresem a tárcám.



Why isn't "tollad" "tolladat" and "tárcám" "tárcámat?

Kérjük, magyarazni.


Köszönöm!


Stephen