Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

 INTRODUCTION
Simone: Hi everyone and welcome to Upper Beginner Hungarian, season 1, lesson 17, Toughing it Out in Hungary. I am Simone.
Csaba: And I am Csaba.
Simone: In this lesson we’re going to learn about a special conjugation form and learn to say stuff like “I see you...”
Csaba: The conversation takes place at Susan’s apartment.
Simone: The conversation is between Susan and Dani.
Csaba: They use the informal language.
Simone: Let’s listen to it now.
DIALOGUE
Susan: Hová indulsz?
Dani: Megyek templomba.
Susan: Tényleg? Várj, elkísérlek én is. Elviszlek kocsival, rendben?
Dani: Rendben, megvárlak. De siess, kilenckor dolgoznom kell.
Susan: Ma is dolgozol? Te aztán kemény vagy.
Dani: Valamiből meg kell élni.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Susan: Hová indulsz?
Dani: Megyek templomba.
Susan: Tényleg? Várj, elkísérlek én is. Elviszlek kocsival, rendben?
Dani: Rendben, megvárlak. De siess, kilenckor dolgoznom kell.
Susan: Ma is dolgozol? Te aztán kemény vagy.
Dani: Valamiből meg kell élni.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Susan: Hová indulsz?
Simone: Where are you leaving for?
Dani: Megyek templomba.
Simone: I'm going to church.
Susan: Tényleg? Várj, elkísérlek én is. Elviszlek kocsival, rendben?
Simone: Really? I'll go with you. I'll give you a lift, ok?
Dani: Rendben, megvárlak. De siess, kilenckor dolgoznom kell.
Simone: All right, I'll wait for you. But hurry up, I have to work at nine.
Susan: Ma is dolgozol? Te aztán kemény vagy.
Simone: You're working today? You really are tough.
Dani: Valamiből meg kell élni.
Simone: Well, you gotta make a living.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Simone: What is the biggest religion in Hungary? I don’t think we’ve mentioned this topic yet.
Csaba: The biggest groups is Roman Catholics, or katolikus, I think than about 55 percent of the population. The second largest is Calvinists, they are called református in Hungarian.
Simone: What percent of the population?
Csaba: Around 20. You have to understand though, the entire topic of religion comes up very rarely. We don’t have politicians photographed in church and nobody ever asks what religion you are. It’s not because the topic is too intimate or taboo, but people nowadays don’t care too much.
Simone: All right, let’s take a look at the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Simone: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Csaba: templom [natural native speed]
Simone: church
Csaba: templom [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: templom [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: indul [natural native speed]
Simone: leave
Csaba: indul [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: indul [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: elkísér [natural native speed]
Simone: see off, follow
Csaba: elkísér [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: elkísér [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: elvisz [natural native speed]
Simone: give a lift
Csaba: elvisz [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: elvisz [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: megvár [natural native speed]
Simone: wait for
Csaba: megvár [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: megvár [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: sietni [natural native speed]
Simone: to hurry
Csaba: sietni [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: sietni [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: Te aztán... [natural native speed]
Simone: You really are ...
Csaba: Te aztán... [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: Te aztán... [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: kemény [natural native speed]
Simone: tough, hard
Csaba: kemény [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: kemény [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: Valamiből meg kell élni. [natural native speed]
Simone: You gotta make a living.
Csaba: Valamiből meg kell élni. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: Valamiből meg kell élni. [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: megél [natural native speed]
Simone: "make, ends, meet"
Csaba: megél [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: megél [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Simone: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Csaba: The first expression is this
Simone: Repeat the following sentence
Csaba: Te festetted? Te aztán ügyes vagy. Te aztán ügyes vagy.
Simone: You really are smart. How do you say
Csaba: Te aztán hülye vagy. I’ll repeat that again now
Simone: All right, we’ve got that. What is the next one?
Csaba: Another useful expression is valamiből meg kell élni. This means something like “you gotta make a living” or “you gotta pay the bills.”
Simone: Repeat the expression again, please.
Csaba: Valamiből meg kell élni. Megélni means “make a living.” The meg- prefix is cut off because of the auxiliary, kell, or “have to.”
Simone: We cut off prefixes when there is an auxiliary nearby.
Csaba: We’ll discuss that later, but something like that. Another example
Simone: “You can’t make a living out of this much.”
Csaba: Ennyiből nem lehet megélni. Ennyiből literally means “out of this much.” Lehet is “able, may, can.”
Simone: Okay. There are two very similar verbs in this lesson.
Csaba: Elvinni is “to take someone” or “to give someone” a lift. Elkísérni is “to follow” or “to go with someone somewhere.”
Simone: Let’s compare those two.
Csaba: Elviszlek az étterembe.
Simone: “I’ll take you to the restaurant.”
Csaba: Elviszlek az étterembe. It implies that it is my idea and also that I’ll probably pay. But this one
Simone: “I’ll go with you to the restaurant.”
Csaba: Elkísérlek az étterembe. It means that you may already have a meeting there or you wanted to eat there anyway.
Simone: OK, that about does it for this vocabulary section. Let’s see the grammar point of the day.

Lesson focus

Simone: In this lesson we’re going to learn about a special conjugation that we haven’t covered before.
Csaba: This is the first sentence we’ll e looking at
Simone: “I’ll go with you.” (I’ll follow you.)
Csaba: Elkísérlek én is. Elkísér is “to follow, to see off, to accompany.” The ending, -lek is a special. Here is the rule
Simone: So there is a special conjugation for when my object is you.
Csaba: This has not much to do with definite-indefinite considerations. Just remember this for now.
Simone: What other sentences did we have in the text?
Csaba: Elviszlek kocsival, rendben?
Simone: “I’ll take you by car.” or “I’ll give you a lift.”
Csaba: Elviszlek kocsival, rendben? Elvisz is “take” and the -lek ending means that the object is you.
Simone: Let’s see all three endings now. Definite, indefinite, I-you.
Csaba: Látok egy kutyát. The verb is látok.
Simone: “I see a dog.”
Csaba: Látom a kutyát. Látom.
Simone: “I see the dog.”
Csaba: Látlak. Látlak.
Simone: “I see you.”
Csaba: One more thing before we wrap this up. The “you” object can be singular and plural as well. In both cases we use the same endings.
Simone: Then how do you know if látlak means “I see you – one person” or “I see you – guys.”
Csaba: You can use the accusative form of “you.” Téged. Látlak téged.
Simone: “I see you” singular. Téged is “you” in the accusative.
Csaba: The plural form is titeket. Látlak titeket.
Simone: “I see you” plural. Titeket is “you” plural.
Csaba: You guys please make sure you go through the PDF file and you look up all the other similarly conjugated verbs from the dialogue.
Simone: We have also provided a table for you. And until next time, bye!
Csaba: Sziasztok!

Outro

Simone: That just about does it for today.
Csaba: Attention iPhone, iPod or iPad users!
Simone: Listen, tap, and swipe your way to fluency with our Hungarian language apps!
Csaba: Grow your vocabulary and practice on the go with our Hungarian language applications.
Simone: Fun and easy to use, Hungarian apps are available on iTunes.
Csaba: Visit our iPhone page on HungarianPod101.com/iPhone now to learn more.

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi everyone!

Let's practice some sentences with these verbs!

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 07:58 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Efrat,


You chose a very peculiar example, because in that case both "Ez a hét kemény lesz." and "Ez a hét nehéz lesz." would be correct. However "kemény" and "nehéz" does not mean the same thing. "Kemény" means tough as in a tough person or a tough surface or so on. "Nehéz" on the other hand means heavy. It could mean a heavy task or it could also mean that an object weighs a lot.

So in your particular example they both have a similar meaning, but generally they signify different qualities.


If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to send us a comment!


Vivien

Team HungarianPod101.com

Efrat
Thursday at 03:22 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello,

I'd like to ask about the word - 'Kemény'.

I understand it means: tough, hard.

How is it different from the word 'Nehéz'?

At first I thought 'Kemény' is used to describe hard textures only, while 'Nehéz' refers to things that are uneasy / not simple.

But then I saw that in the dialogue 'Kemény' was used to describe someone's personality (Te aztán kemény vagy) or a challenging period of time (Ez a hét kemény lesz).

Are there clear situations where you have to choose the right option out of the two, OR, are they synonyms that can be both used in any-case?

Would it be correct, for instance, to say: Ez a hét nehéz lesz (instead of - Ez a hét kemény lesz)?


(If the words do differ, I would very much appreciate some examples for each word).


Best regards,

Efrat.

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:00 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Szia Stephen,


Thank you for your comment!


I think that both “The church is round the corner.” and “The church is at the corner.” are right translations, because in both case you would say “A templom a sarkon van”.


The phrase “a sarkon túl” would mean for me that the church is further than the corner, which is perfectly correct, but it has a slightly different meaning.:wink:


If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to send us a comment!


Dorottya

Team HungarianPod101.com

Stephen
Thursday at 10:35 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

"A templom a sarkon van" is translated as "The church is round the corner."

Shouldn't it be "The church is at the corner."?


"Around the corner" would be "a sarkon túl" correct?