Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Simone: Hi everyone and welcome to Upper Beginner Hungarian, season 1, lesson 20. Catching Up on Some Hungarian Music. I am Simone.
Csaba: And I am Csaba.
Simone: In this lesson we’re going to cover some translation issues.
Csaba: The conversation takes place at Susan’s apartment.
Simone: The conversation is between Susan and Dani.
Csaba: They use the informal language.
Simone: Let’s listen to it now.
DIALOGUE
Susan: Mit hallgatsz?
Dani: Népzenét hallgatok. Meghallgatod te is ezt a lemezt?
Susan: Nem nagyon szeretem a népzenét. Inkább megnézem a sorozatomat.
Dani: Az eheti részt még nem néztem meg. Te hol tartasz?
Susan: A 11. résznél.
Dani: Akkor holnap utolérlek.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Susan: Mit hallgatsz?
Dani: Népzenét hallgatok. Meghallgatod te is ezt a lemezt?
Susan: Nem nagyon szeretem a népzenét. Inkább megnézem a sorozatomat.
Dani: Az eheti részt még nem néztem meg. Te hol tartasz?
Susan: A 11. résznél.
Dani: Akkor holnap utolérlek.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Susan: Mit hallgatsz?
Simone: What are you listening to?
Dani: Népzenét hallgatok. Meghallgatod te is ezt a lemezt?
Simone: I'm listening to folk music. Do you want to listen to this CD too?
Susan: Nem nagyon szeretem a népzenét. Inkább megnézem a sorozatomat.
Simone: I don't like folk music that much. I'll watch my TV show instead.
Dani: Az eheti részt még nem néztem meg. Te hol tartasz?
Simone: I haven't seen this week's episode. Where are you at now?
Susan: A 11. résznél.
Simone: At episode 11.
Dani: Akkor holnap utolérlek.
Simone: I'll catch up with you tomorrow then.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Csaba: You guys may have heard the name Kodály. He was a composer, researcher and teacher of music.
Simone: In what context is he more famous? Why should we know him?
Csaba: His method, the Kodály method has been used in many countries around the world in the teaching of music. While he was working on the methodology of music education, he also collected and archived thousands of folk songs.
Simone: Of which you know how many?
Csaba: Haha, you’d be surprised how many. In elementary school barely a week goes by without learning a couple new songs – this is one of the pillars of his concept. Teaching naturally evolved folk songs.
Simone: Lucky for us, this studio is not built for the recording of singing. Otherwise, you’d be on.
Csaba: Yeah, lucky for all our listeners. I never said I was any good.
Simone: All right. Let’s see the vocab section.
VOCAB LIST
Simone: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Csaba: hallgatni [natural native speed]
Simone: to listen to
Csaba: hallgatni [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: hallgatni [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: népzene [natural native speed]
Simone: folk music
Csaba: népzene [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: népzene [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: megnéz [natural native speed]
Simone: look, check
Csaba: megnéz [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: megnéz [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: sorozat [natural native speed]
Simone: series, soap opera, show
Csaba: sorozat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: sorozat [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: eheti [natural native speed]
Simone: this week's
Csaba: eheti [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: eheti [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: rész [natural native speed]
Simone: part, episode
Csaba: rész [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: rész [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: tart [natural native speed]
Simone: be at a position
Csaba: tart [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: tart [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: utolér [natural native speed]
Simone: catch up
Csaba: utolér [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: utolér [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Simone: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Simone: What is the first word?
Csaba: We start with the word tart. This is a verb and it means “to be at a certain point in a process.”
Simone: Can you give us an example?
Csaba: A hatodik leckénél tartok.
Simone: “I’m at lesson six.”
Csaba: A hatodik leckénél tartok. Hatodik lecke is “the sixth lesson.” The place where you are at in the sentence will get the -nál, -nél suffix very often.
Simone: How do you say
Csaba: A munka felénél tartok. Fele means “the half of something.” Felénél is “at the half point.” A munka felénél tartok.
Simone: All right, let’s see the next one.
Csaba: Utolér means “catch up.” Utol behaves like a prefix, that is, in certain cases (like negatives) it is detached from the verb. Nem érlek utol.
Simone: “I won’t catch up with you.”
Csaba: Nem érlek utol.
Simone: This is a negative sentence. Let’s say a positive sentence too.
Csaba: Utolértem a csoportot.
Simone: “I’ve caught up with the group.”
Csaba: Utolértem a csoportot. And finally, we shall learn about music. Népzene is “folk music.” This is a compound noun, nép is “folk.”
Simone: You can use quite a bit of your English vocabulary to get certain musical styles easily. Name a couple genres in Hungarian, please. The easy ones, just for the pronunciation.
Csaba: jazz zene blues zene rockzene metálzene
Simone: All very easy to decode. All right, let’s see the grammar point.
Csaba: Let’s do that.

Lesson focus

Simone: In this lesson we’re going to teach you a couple of tricks that will help your translation skills.
Csaba: Hungarian is not always very easy to translate into English, because English has many more tenses that are expressed somewhat differently. In the followoing few minutes we’ll teach you what tense to choose in English, when in Hungarian you have a present tense sentence.
Simone: What is the first sentence?
Csaba: Népzenét hallgatok.
Simone: “I’m listening to folk music.”
Csaba: Népzenét hallgatok. The first sentence, without the context could be translated into Hungarian as a simple present or a present continuous sentence.
Simone: So “I listen to folk music” is also a good translation.
Csaba: Exactly. We only chose the continuous because the context determined so. However, when Dani says this
Simone: “Do you want to listen to this CD too?”
Csaba: Meghallgatod te is ezt a lemezt? This question implies an offer and it is probably best to translate into English as such. “Do you want to listen to this CD?”
Simone: Let’s compare two more sentences. When you”re standing up from the couch with a determined look on your face and you’re asked the question mit csinálsz? “What are you doing?”
Csaba: In that case you answer
Simone: “I’ll look for/find my keys.”
Csaba: Megkeresem a kulcsom. This communicates that you’ll find your keys for sure and you’ll not stop until done.
Simone: Now let’s say that you’re elbow deep in your backpack and the room is a mess already from your frantic search. In that case, you answer
Csaba: Keresem a kulcsom.
Simone: “I’m looking for my keys.”
Csaba: Keresem a kulcsom.
Simone: In English we used present continuous and simple future, yet in Hungarian both of them are present tense.
Csaba: And the slight difference was the prefix. Now if you’re messing these up and you say megkeresem, while in the middle of searching, will not result in unintelligible sentences.
Simone: But it does sound strange and unusual for the Hungarian ear.
Csaba: Right. Now, ladies and gentlemen, please go to our PDF guide for more content.
Simone: And we shall return next time with more. Bye!
Csaba: Sziasztok!

Outro

Simone: That just about does it for today.
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5 Comments

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HungarianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi everyone!

Why don't you give us a sentence in English, then translate it in Hungarian here?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:11 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jessica,

"még" means "yet"

while

"meg" is one of the most common prefixes, which belongs to verb "néz":

"megnéz" means "watch"

I hope this helps.


Zsuzsanna

Team HungarianPod101.com

Jessica
Tuesday at 12:57 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Az eheti részt még nem néztem meg. Te hol tartasz?

why is the different about még and meg in this sentence? how to use them correctly.

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 01:43 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Tom!


Thank you for your input!


I'll get it changed immediately.


"Meghallgat, and other result-prefix verbs are neither continuous, neither habitual by default."


should be changed to


"Meghallgat, and other result-prefix verbs are neither continuous, nor habitual by default."


Csaba

Team HungarianPod101.com

Tom Koenig
Thursday at 01:10 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Meghallgat, and other result-prefix verbs are neither continuous, neither habitual by default.

Jobb, mint a (is better as):

Meghallgat, and other result-prefix verbs are neither continuous, nor habitual by default.