Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

 INTRODUCTION
Simone: Hi everyone and welcome to Upper Beginner Hungarian, season 1, lesson 8, How to Get Yourself Invited to a Hungarian Party. I am Simone.
Csaba: And I am Csaba.
Simone: In this lesson we’re going to learn to use some time words and we’ll organize social events.
Csaba: The conversation takes place on the phone.
Simone: The conversation is between Peti and Susan.
Csaba: They use the informal language.
Simone: We’ll listen to the dialogue now.
DIALOGUE
Susan:Halló, szia Peti.
Peti:Helló Susan.
Susan:Meglátogatunk este, mit szólsz?
Peti:Hánykor? Kilenckor érek haza.
Susan:Hű, későn nem akarunk zavarni.
Peti:Nem zavartok. De akkor gyertek pénteken.
Susan:Az hanyadika?
Peti:Hatodika.
Susan:Oké, akkor hatodikán!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Susan:Halló, szia Peti.
Peti:Helló Susan.
Susan:Meglátogatunk este, mit szólsz?
Peti:Hánykor? Kilenckor érek haza.
Susan:Hű, későn nem akarunk zavarni.
Peti:Nem zavartok. De akkor gyertek pénteken.
Susan:Az hanyadika?
Peti:Hatodika.
Susan:Oké, akkor hatodikán!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Susan:Halló, szia Peti.
Simone: Hello, hi Pete.
Peti: Helló Susan.
Simone: Hi, Susan.
Susan: Meglátogatunk este, mit szólsz?
Simone: We'll visit you tonight, what do you think?
Peti: Hánykor? Kilenckor érek haza.
Simone: What time? I get home at nine.
Susan: Hű, későn nem akarunk zavarni.
Simone: Oh, we don't want to bother you too late.
Peti: Nem zavartok. De akkor gyertek pénteken.
Simone: You don't bother me at all. But you can also come over on Friday then.
Susan: Az hanyadika?
Simone: What date is that?
Peti: Hatodika.
Simone: That's the sixth.
Susan: Oké, akkor hatodikán!
Simone: Alright, see you on the sixth then.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Simone: They really got themselves invited, huh?
Csaba: This only happens between good friends though. But all in all, I’d say that Hungarian people prefer meeting at someone’s home to a restaurant.
Simone: Yes, I have been to the homes of all my colleagues back then.
Csaba: Restaurants are less in the culture of Hungarians than cooking for your guests, I would say. It is also a good way to get drunk in a controlled environment and to try the homemade brandy that everyone is so proud of.
Simone: That is not always a good idea. But it eliminates the problem of who’s picking up the bill.
Csaba: But that means that you’re also kind of expected to do the same at some point. Try to remember to invite them back at some point. The sooner the better.
Simone: All right, let’s take a look at the vocab part.
Csaba: Let’s do that.
VOCAB LIST
Simone: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Csaba: meglátogat [natural native speed]
Simone: visit
Csaba: meglátogat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: meglátogat [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: Mit szólsz? [natural native speed]
Simone: How you like that? / What do you think about that?
Csaba: Mit szólsz? [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: Mit szólsz? [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: hánykor [natural native speed]
Simone: what time
Csaba: hánykor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: hánykor [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: hazaér [natural native speed]
Simone: get home
Csaba: hazaér [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: hazaér [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: zavar [natural native speed]
Simone: disturb, bother
Csaba: zavar [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: zavar [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: hanyadika [natural native speed]
Simone: what day (date)
Csaba: hanyadika [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: hanyadika [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: későn [natural native speed]
Simone: late
Csaba: későn [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: későn [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: hatodika [natural native speed]
Simone: the sixth
Csaba: hatodika [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: hatodika [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: akkor [natural native speed]
Simone: then
Csaba: akkor [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: akkor [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Simone: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Csaba: The first item is Hazaér or “get home.” The first half of the word is haza, which means “to home.” Ér means “to get to, to reach.”
Simone: Let’s put it in a sentence.
Csaba: Este hazaérek.
Simone: “I'll get home in the evening.”
Csaba: Este hazaérek. By rearranging the word order, you can give emphasis to a certain element. Este érek haza.
Simone: “I’ll get home in the evening.” And not in the afternoon. Say that again for us.
Csaba: Este érek haza.
Simone: Let’s move on to the next one.
Csaba: Akkor means “then.” Repeat this sentence
Simone: “I won't go then.”
Csaba: Akkor nem megyek. This word can carry several meanings, but in this sentence it expresses that the speaker has changed his plans or opinion, due to a new circumstance.
Simone: All right, I think that is about as precise an explanation as we can get.
Csaba: And finally, we had mit szólsz?
Simone: “What do you think?”
Csaba: Mit szólsz? The literal translation is “what say you?”
Simone: Can you make a more complicated sentence with this expression?
Csaba: Sure. Hatkor megyünk, mit szólsz?
Simone: “We'll go at six, what do you think?”
Csaba: Hatkor megyünk, mit szólsz? This is just added to the preceding suggestion.
Simone: Seems simple enough. Shall we go over to the vocab section? Mit szólsz?
Csaba: “I agree wholeheartedly.”

Lesson focus

Simone: In this lesson we’re going to learn about telling time in Hungarian and we’ll say phrases like “on Saturday.”
Csaba: The first sentence is Kilenckor érek haza.
Simone: “I get home at nine o'clock.”
Csaba: Kilenckor érek haza. There is a numeral here, kilenc, which is then affixed with -kor, which means “at.” Kilenckor.
Simone: And just like we had one noun ending last time with only one form, -kor is also alone.
Csaba: Right. Attach this to any numeral. But you can also attach that to other words. Repeat this sentence
Simone: “I'll finish at half past.”
Csaba: Félkor végzek. Fél means “half” and félkor is “at half past.”
Simone: All right. Let’s move on with the dialogue.
Csaba: Another ending that you have to learn here is -án, -én. These endings are added to ordinal numerals to form the days of the month.
Simone: An example, please.
Csaba: Harmadikán fizetek.
Simone: “I'll pay on the third.”
Csaba: Harmadikán fizetek. Harmadik is “the third” and harmadikán is “on the third.” Now this same ending is used with the days of the week, but there are so many forms that you have to consider, depending on the vowels and whether the name of the day ends in a vowel, that it is easier to remember them one by one.
Simone: And we’ll teach you just that. Csaba will say them like this
Csaba: hétfő – hétfőn
Simone: “Monday, on Monday”
Csaba: kedd – kedden
Simone: “Tuesday, on Tuesday.”
Csaba: szerda – szerdán
Simone: “Wednesday, on Wednesday”
Csaba: csütörtök – csütörtökön
Simone: “Thursday, on Thursday”
Csaba: péntek – pénteken
Simone: “Friday, on Friday”
Csaba: szombat – szombaton
Simone: “Saturday, on Saturday”
Csaba: Sunday is an exception. vasárnap – vasárnap. Both orms are the same. All right, let’s put one or two in a sentence.
Simone: “School starts on Monday.”
Csaba: Hétfőn kezdődik a suli.
Simone: Repeat again.
Csaba: Hétfőn kezdődik a suli.
Simone: All right, I think we gave our listeners a fair amount to learn.
Csaba: Guys, make sure you check out the PDF guide. And until next time, sziasztok.
Simone: Bye!

Outro

Simone: That just about does it for today.
Csaba: Listeners, do you know the powerful secret behind rapid progress?
Simone: Using the entire system.
Csaba: Lesson notes are an important part of this system.
Simone: They include a transcript and translation of the conversation...
Csaba: ...key lesson vocabulary...
Simone: and detailed grammar explanations.
Csaba: Lesson notes accompany every audio or video lesson.
Simone: Use them on the site or mobile device or print them out.
Csaba: Using the lesson notes with audio and video media, will rapidly increase your learning speed.
Simone: Go to HungarianPod101.com, and download the lesson notes for this lesson right now.

3 Comments

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HungarianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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Hi everyone! What time is it now? Could you read the time in Hungarian and leave a comment here?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:06 AM
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Szia Amy,


You're right, hétfő means head of the week!

Kedd comes from ancient Hungarian word "keted" which meant second.

Szerda comes from Slavic languages meaning "middle", in Slovenian it's Sreda

Csütörtök also Slavic origin, in Slovenian we say Csetvrtek

Péntek also Slavic, in Slovenian Petek, coming from piat (five)

Szombat comes from Hebrew Sabbath, which is the day of rest,

Vasárnap is coming from "vásár nap" which means traditionally the day of market (still common in Hungary)



It was a very interesting point, thank you very much! :thumbsup:


Dorottya

Team HungarianPod101.com

Amy
Monday at 10:48 AM
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I'd be curious to know the word origins of the days of the week. I get that "hétfő" is the head of the week. Am wondering if "péntek" is related to penta- meaning the 5th day of the week? Is kedd related to kettő as the second day of the week? Are any of the days of the week related to the names of the sun, moon, and planets like in many other indo-european languages?