Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

 INTRODUCTION
Simone: Hi everyone and welcome to Upper Beginner Hungarian, season 1, lesson 7, The Diet Can Wait Until Tomorrow in Hungary. I am Simone.
Csaba: And I am Csaba.
Simone: In this lesson we’ll finally leave all those possessives behind and learn a couple of simple noun cases to form sentences like “go to Peter” and “go for Peter.”
Csaba: The conversation takes place at Susan’s.
Simone: The conversation is between Susan and Péter.
Csaba: They use the informal language.
Simone: Take it away.
DIALOGUE
Dani: Még korán van. Átmenjünk Petihez?
Susan: Menjünk, Petinél mindig van valami desszert.
Dani: Előtte leugrom a boltba chipsért meg piáért.
Susan: Kocsival megyünk?
Dani: Nem, sétáljunk. Jó idő van.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Dani: Még korán van. Átmenjünk Petihez?
Susan: Menjünk, Petinél mindig van valami desszert.
Dani: Előtte leugrom a boltba chipsért meg piáért.
Susan: Kocsival megyünk?
Dani: Nem, sétáljunk. Jó idő van.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Dani: Még korán van. Átmenjünk Petihez?
Simone: It's still early. You want to go over to Pete's?
Susan: Menjünk, Petinél mindig van valami desszert.
Simone: Let's go. There is always some kind of dessert at his place.
Dani: Előtte leugrom a boltba chipsért meg piáért.
Simone: First, I'll go downstairs to the store for some chips and booze.
Susan: Kocsival megyünk?
Simone: Are we taking the car?
Dani: Nem, sétáljunk. Jó idő van.
Simone: No, let's walk. The weather is nice.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Simone: Talking about desserts, what is the one you always have in Hungary?
Csaba: My personal favorite is called krémes. This is a creamy, yellow dessert, made of sugar, eggs and milk, with a little bit of crust on the top.
Simone: And it comes in fist-sized cubes. I know that one. You literally hear it sticking to your ribs.
Csaba: Well, desserts are not supposed to be healthy or slimming. If you prefer salty treats, we recommend pogácsa, which comes in many different versions, but the basis is always a bread-like dough baked.
Simone: To which they add cottage cheese or bacon or potatoes even.
Csaba: It is more of a full meal than a dessert actually. Oh, and one more sweet thing, and I’m really bringing out the big guns
Simone: How would you describe that to the listeners?
Csaba: Sugar induced coma. There is a lot of cream on top of a layer of sweet cottage cheese and a bit of crust for show. It is great and terrible at the same time.
Simone: All right, let’s take a look at the key vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Simone: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Csaba: korán [natural native speed]
Simone: early
Csaba: korán [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: korán [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: átmegy [natural native speed]
Simone: go over
Csaba: átmegy [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: átmegy [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: desszert [natural native speed]
Simone: dessert
Csaba: desszert [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: desszert [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: leugrik [natural native speed]
Simone: go down for something
Csaba: leugrik [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: leugrik [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: chips [natural native speed]
Simone: chips
Csaba: chips [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: chips [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: kocsi [natural native speed]
Simone:car
Csaba: kocsi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: kocsi [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: sétál [natural native speed]
Simone: walk
Csaba: sétál [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: sétál [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: pia [natural native speed]
Simone: booze
Csaba: pia [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: pia [natural native speed]
Next:
Csaba: idő [natural native speed]
Simone: weather
Csaba: idő [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Csaba: idő [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Simone: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Csaba: The first sentence we cover is a prefix-word compound
Simone: “Go over.”
Csaba: Let’s put it in a sentence
Simone: “I'm going over to mom's.”
Csaba: Átmegyek anyuhoz. The prefix át- is “over, through, across.”
Simone: All right, let’s move on.
Csaba: The second sentence we cover is a prefix-verb compound.
Simone: Wait... Am I having a deja vu?
Csaba: No, we really do use them very often. Leugrom a boltba. The verb here is leugrom, or “I jump down.” Besides the literal meaning, to “jump down from someplace” it also means “to run down” to a store or the pub. A short trip, basically.
Simone: Say the sentence again.
Csaba: Leugrom a boltba.
Simone: “I’m running down to the store.”
Csaba: The next one is easy. Pia means “booze.” Not much else to say about it, an informal way to call alcoholic beverages.
Simone: And what is the last vocab item?
Csaba: Jó idő van means “the weather is nice.” Idő, which also means “time,” means “weather” in these sentences.
Simone: “something”… idő van is like “the weather is ...”
Csaba: Right, any kind of adjective works here. Rossz idő van.
Simone: “The weather is bad.”
Csaba: Rossz idő van.
Simone: Let’s teach them one more adjective you can use in this sentence.
Csaba: Esős idő van.
Simone: “The weather is rainy.” Esős is “rainy.”
Csaba: Esős idő van.
Simone: All right, let’s see what we have for grammar in this lesson.

Lesson focus

Simone: In this lesson we’re going to teach you a couple of simple noun endings. More specifically we’ll teach you to express meanings like “to Peter” and “for Peter.”
Csaba: Átmenjünk Petihez?
Simone: “Shall we go over to Pete's?”
Csaba: Átmenjünk Petihez? This is the first sentence we have to cover. Átmenjünk is “shall we go over.” Petihez is Peti, or “Pete” with the case ending -hez. -hez, attached to a noun means “to that noun.”
Simone: But I’m guessing that there are more than one forms for this suffix, to match the vowels of the noun.
Csaba: There are three actually
Simone: “I'll park the car at the/by the house.”
Csaba: A házhoz parkolok. This time we attached -hoz, because ház, or “house” is a back vowel noun.
Simone: Let’s take a look at another sentence from the dialogue.
Csaba: Petinél mindig van valami desszert.
Simone: “There is always some kind of dessert at his place.”
Csaba: Petinél mindig van valami desszert. This time the poor guy’s name has -nél attached to it. Petinél. This means “at Pete’s, by Pete.” The ending -nél, or the back vowel version, -nál expresses “existence at or by” a certain noun.
Simone: Let’s hear a back vowel word too.
Csaba: A táskám az asztalnál van.
Simone: “My bag is by the table.”
Csaba: A táskám az asztalnál van. Asztal is “table” and it is a back vowel word. Therefore “by the table” is asztalnál.
Simone: All right, anything else?
Csaba: Leugrom a boltba chipsért meg piáért.
Simone: “I'll go downstairs to the store for some chips and booze.”
Csaba: Leugrom a boltba chipsért meg piáért. Chipsért is “for chips” and piáért is “for booze.” the ending -ért means “for.”
Simone: Can I attach this to names as well?
Csaba: Sure. Leugrom Tamásért.
Simone: “I’ll run down to get Thomas.”
Csaba: Leugrom Tamásért. This is what you would say when you o downstairs to let him in the building.
Simone: What is the other vowel form.
Csaba: Great news, there is none. Any noun can take -ért. There aren’t many case endings that only have one form.
Simone: Well that is great news to the end of the lesson. Guys, make sure you read the PDF guide for further examples.

Outro

Simone: That just about does it for today.
Simone: Attention perfectionists! You're about to learn how to perfect your pronunciation.
Csaba: Lesson Review Audio Tracks.
Simone: Increase fluency and vocabulary fast with these short, effective audio tracks.
Csaba: Super simple to use. Listen to the Hungarian word or phrase...
Simone: then repeat it out loud in a loud clear voice.
Csaba: You'll speak with confidence knowing that you're speaking Hungarian like the locals.
Simone: Go to HungarianPod101.com, and download the Review Audio Tracks right on the lessons page today!
Simone: Bye!!
Csaba: And we’ll see you next time. Sziasztok.

11 Comments

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HungarianPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Hi everyone!

Did you found them helpful?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Friday at 08:55 PM
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Hi Sonja,

"le" is one of the most common preverbs 'connecting' to a lot of common verbs.

The verb in your sentence is "lepakol" in some cases the preverb leaves the verb.


Zsuzsanna

HungarianPod101.com

Sonja
Thursday at 08:06 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello.

Could ypu please explain the purpose and the meaning of the word 'le' in the sentence 'Hol parkoltad le a kocsit'. It also appeared few times in previous lessons, but I think there was never an explanation for this kind of construction.


Köszönöm!

Sonja

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:03 PM
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Hi Jessica,

"egyet" stands for "a" walk.


Zsuzsanna

Team HungarianPod101.com

Jessica
Thursday at 06:25 AM
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Sétáljunk egyet. Let's take a walk

Sétáljunk means: we walk, how about egyet? why use this word for take?

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 03:26 AM
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Szia Keith!


Thank you very much for your comment!


"Elöször" means First, for the first time and "Elötte" means literally before something! 😉


If you have any other questions please send us a comment!

Best,

Dorottya

Team HungarianPod101.com

Keith Valachi
Tuesday at 12:14 AM
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Can you explain the difference between elöször and elötte: Koszi


Keith

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:35 AM
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Szia Amy!


Very good comment!


The conjugation of the verb "leugrik" is not a question of definite or indefinite verb (even though it looks totally like definite).

The verbs with the "ik" ending (in dictionary form) can be conjugated in two ways in the first person!

Ex.

Legugrik: leugrok/leugrom

Eszik : eszem/eszek

Alszik : alszok/alszom.


Not to mix with transitive verbs which have an object, where the ending "m" is used as a sign of the object.


I hope it's more clear know! if you have other questions, please send a comment!


Kitartás!


Dorottya

Team HungarianPod101.com

Amy
Friday at 06:50 AM
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I'm sure this is the sort of thing that will make more sense to me as I get deeper into the grammar, but I was wondering if you could try to explain why in the dialogue it says "Leugrom a boltba chipsért meg piáért", but in the vocab expansion it says, "Leugrok piáért." Why is the one sentence definite and the other indefinite? It seems like the meaning is almost identical??

HungarianPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:55 PM
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Hi Stephen,

Thank you for pointing this mistake out. We fixed it!:wink:


Enjoy learning Hungarian with us!


Szép napot!


Gergő

Team HungarianPod101.com

Stephen Kristan
Wednesday at 11:13 AM
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The lesson review says:

korán jön "come early"


But isn't a more accurate translation: he/she comes early?

Wouldn't "Come early" as a command or request be: korán gyere/jöjj/jöjjél?


Köszönöm...


Steve