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Archive for the 'Hungarian Holidays' Category

The Hungarian National Anthem

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In this article, we are going to introduce you to the Hungarian national anthem, the song that is the heart of any nation. This one, however, is known for its melancholy and dour tone. Despite all this, it is important to know as part of the Hungarian culture, to truly understand this complex nation.

For this reason, we are going to show you the full Hungarian anthem lyrics in English, so you’ll be able to understand the whole song. It must be noted, however, that due to the old age of the piece, some of the words in the text are no longer grammatically correct! Will you spot which ones?

Now, we are going to cover not only the lyrics but also the history of the piece and nation, as well as occasions when you might hear the Hungarian national anthem playing.

If you are ready to dive deeper into Hungarian culture and understand their past, let’s go

Kids Singing with Their Hands on Their Heart

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Hungarian Table of Contents
  1. Lyrics
  2. History
  3. Occasions
  4. How HungarianPod101.com Helps You Reach Your Goals in Learning Hungarian

1. Lyrics

In this section, we are going to show you the full Hungarian anthem lyrics in English so that you can understand it all – more or less, as the text is old Hungarian and, thus, has some old English. For this reason, bear in mind that some words are either not used anymore in today’s Hungarian language or are spelled differently.

As you will notice, the Hungarian anthem is rather sad, so prepare yourself to be moved. We highlighted the first verse for you, as only this one is usually sung, for example, at sports events, since the song is rather slow to match the melancholy of the text.

Isten, áldd meg a magyart
Jó kedvvel, bőséggel,
Nyújts feléje védő kart,
Ha küzd ellenséggel;
Bal sors akit régen tép,
Hozz rá víg esztendőt,
Megbünhödte már e nép
A multat s jövendőt!

“God, bless the Hungarian
With joy and abundance.
Reach out to him with a protective arm
When he fights with foes;
Doom is whom he long has been fighting
Give him a merry year,
This nation has been twisting slowly in the wind
Because of the past and the future!”

“Abundance” – Bőség
“To twist slowly in the wind” – Megbűnhődni

Hungarian Flag

Őseinket felhozád
Kárpát szent bércére,
Általad nyert szép hazát
Bendegúznak vére.
S merre zúgnak habjai
Tiszának, Dunának,
Árpád hős magzatjai
Felvirágozának.

“You bring up our ancestors
To the sacred shores of Carpathia,
A beautiful homeland won by you
By the blood of Bendegúz.
And where the foams roar
Of the Tisza and the Danube,
The heroic fetus of Árpád
Shall blossom.”

“Homeland” – Haza
“To blossom” – Felvirágozni

Értünk Kunság mezein
Ért kalászt lengettél,
Tokaj szőlővesszein
Nektárt csepegtettél.
Zászlónk gyakran plántálád
Vad török sáncára,
S nyögte Mátyás bús hadát 
Bécsnek büszke vára.

“For us in the fields of Kunság
Thou wavedst a calyx for us,
On the vineyards of Tokaj
You have dripped nectar.
Our banner you often planted
On the wild Turkish battlements,
And Mátyás moaned his sad war
The proud castle of Vienna.”

Hajh, de bűneink miatt
Gyúlt harag kebledben,
S elsújtád villámidat
Dörgő fellegedben,
Most rabló mongol nyilát
Zúgattad felettünk,
Majd töröktől rabigát
Vállainkra vettünk.

“O, but for our sins
Wrath was kindled in thy bosom,
And thou hast fired thy thunderbolts
In thy thundering clouds,
Now the Mongol arrow of a robber
Thou hast wrought upon us,
And from the Turks, a yoke
We have taken on our shoulders.”

“Yoke” – Rabiga

Hányszor zengett ajkain
Ozman vad népének
Vert hadunk csonthalmain
Győzedelmi ének!
Hányszor támadt tenfiad
Szép hazám kebledre,
S lettél magzatod miatt
Magzatod hamvvedre!

“How often did his lips chant
Of the wild people of Ozman
On the heaps of bones of our war
A song of triumph!
How often did thy son rise
Upon the bosom of you, my fair country,
And for thy fetus’ sake
Thy fetus to thy ashes!”

Bújt az üldözött s felé
Kard nyúl barlangjában,
Szerte nézett s nem lelé
Honját a hazában,
Bércre hág és völgybe száll,
Bú s kétség mellette,
Vérözön lábainál,
S lángtenger fölette.

“The hunted one cowered
In the hollow of his sword,
He looked around and found no
Home in the homeland,
He rides to the valley of the valley,
And he’s in despair,
At his feet blood flow,
And a sea of flame above him.”

“Blood flow” – Vérözön
“Sea of flame” – Lángtenger

Vár állott, most kőhalom,
Kedv s öröm röpkedtek,
Halálhörgés, siralom
Zajlik már helyettek.
S ah, szabadság nem virúl
A holtnak véréből,
Kínzó rabság könnye hull
Árvánk hő szeméből!

“A castle stood, now a heap of stones,
Delight and joy used to fly around,
Death’s thunder, death’s wail
Replaced them now.
And, ah, liberty is no more
From the blood of the dead,
The tears of tortured bondage
From the warm eyes of our orphan!”

Szánd meg Isten a magyart
Kit vészek hányának,
Nyújts feléje védő kart
Tengerén kínjának.
Bal sors akit régen tép,
Hozz rá víg esztendőt,
Megbünhödte már e nép
A multat s jövendőt!

“God have mercy on the Hungarian
Whose being struck by disasters,
Reach out to him with a protective arm
Doom is whom he long has been fighting,
Give him a merry year,
This nation has been twisting slowly in the wind
Because of the past and the future!”

“Doom” – Bal sors

Which words do you think are spelled differently nowadays? Let us know in the comments and write their up-to-date form as well!

Hunyad Castle

2. History

The Hungarian national anthem (called “Himnusz”) was first a poem written by Ferenc Kölcsey on 22 January 1823. Its subtitle was “A magyar nép zivataros századaiból”. Later, after February 1844, Ferenc Erkel wrote a song for the text, and there the Hungarian national anthem was born.

However, the song debuted only a few months later, on 2 July 1844, in the National Theater in Budapest, and became the “official anthem” of the mutilated but independent country around 1918-1919, following the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.

The Hungarian national anthem has numerous references to the unfortunate history of the Hungarians. The narrative begins with conquering the country. “Bendegúz,” the father of the Hun prince Attila, is a reference to the idea that the Hungarian people returned to the Carpathian Basin as the descendants of the Huns, i.e., they took possession of the territory as their rightful inheritance. The reference to the “Árpád hős magzatjai” (The heroic fetus of Árpád) evokes the image of the past of the nobility, the members of which defend their homeland with arms are the descendants and heirs of the conquerors.

The successful historical period ended with the reign of Mátyás who conquered Vienna in 1485, and most of the Austrian provinces also submitted to him. The period of punishment for discord is not sharply separated from the period of prosperity since the “Most rabló mongol nyilát” (Now the Mongol arrow of a robber) refers to the Tatar invasion of 1242-1243, while the “Majd töröktől rabigát” (And from the Turks, a yoke) refers to the period of conquest in the 16-17th centuries. The end of the 5th stanza and stanzas 6-7 generally refer to events of the 16-17th centuries – partisanship, fratricidal warfare, civil war.

The lyrics move on to depicting, generally again, the Habsburg rule, when the Hungarian became a persecuted alien in his own country, saying “Szerte nézett s nem lelé Honját a hazában,” (He looked around and found no Home in the homeland). Some have suggested that the line “Vár állott, most kőhalom’ (A castle stood, now a heap of stones) refers to the order by Lipót I in 1702 to blow up the castles in Hungary. The ‘old glory’ was lost, the ancestors died in vain for the country, and the Hungarian became a ‘poor waif’ in his homeland.

Hungarian National Pin with Imitating the Flag

3. Occasions

The Hungarian national anthem is played mostly in schools, before sporting events, and TV. It is linked to important national holidays and celebrations such as:

    20 August, commemorates the foundation of the state, but the truth is that the state was not founded on 20 August. On this day in 1083, King Stephen, the founder of Hungary was canonized. So, the Hungarian state, the kingdom, had already existed for 83 years when the coronation of Stephen took place in 1000. 

If you’re interested in learning more, check out the Top 5 Important Dates During the Hungarian Calendar Year.

The Hungarian national anthem is always played before team sports events as well, like football (soccer), but also after individual sports events when the athlete won the competition. We can also hear the anthem on the TV, for example, after the countdown to New Year’s.

See our vocabulary list of National Unity.

Athletes on a Podium

4. How HungarianPod101.com Helps You Reach Your Goals in Learning Hungarian

We hope you enjoyed this little insight into Hungarian culture through the Hungarian national anthem. If you still have any questions or you did not understand some of the lyrics because of the old language, let us know.

It must be emphasized that an anthem is the core of every nation, so if you have serious plans in Hungary, it is good to know at least its content, i.e., what it is about. Of course, it is even better to be able to sing it, at least the first verse, but that is just a big cherry on top of your learning journey.

You can find more studying materials like this article on the HungarianPod101 website, but besides blog articles, you will find free vocabulary lists or videos and audio to ease language learning. Not to mention the supportive community that would be behind you, helping you all the way.

Join our community and be a HungarianPod101 member today!

Which Hungarian word spelling from the anthem is outdated nowadays, and how is it written now? Let us know below.

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A Brief Overview of Hungarian Culture

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If you want to visit a country, be it for a short-term summer vacation or a long-term business stay, it’s crucial to familiarize yourself with its culture and society. Hungary is no exception.

In fact, understanding Hungarian culture is just as crucial as knowing the key words and phrases. 

It will help you better integrate into the society and make your interactions with locals much smoother and more authentic. In addition, showing Hungarians that you’re curious about the culture of Hungary can go a long way toward helping you form relationships.

On this page, you’re going to learn about Hungarian cultural norms, some of the country’s history, and more Hungarian culture facts you should know. If you pay close attention, you can avoid a lot of culture shock during your visit and adapt more easily.

Now, let’s dive in!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Hungarian Table of Contents
  1. Values and Beliefs
  2. Religion
  3. Family
  4. Work
  5. Art
  6. Food
  7. Traditional Holidays
  8. How HungarianPod101.com Can Help You Learn More Hungarian

1. Values and Beliefs

A Man Seen from the Back Is at the Airport, Holding His Blue Suitcase

Each culture has certain ideals or concepts that serve as the core of its society. The first step in understanding Hungarian culture and customs is to learn about the values and beliefs of its people.

The most important thing you have to know about Hungarian culture is that people value family very much. Family is the cornerstone of Hungarian society.

Hungarians also tend to value relationships in general. They are very sociable people who enjoy interacting with each other as often as possible. Be it a family member’s graduation ceremony or a friendly barbeque, a Hungarian will be there.

Because Hungarians value strong and long-term relationships, and are thus rather emotion-driven, they like sharing. They don’t mind telling people intimate details about their lives, even to a neighbor or a friendly stranger on the bus. Hungarians trust each other and want to bond.

All in all, Hungarians believe in transparency and honesty, so they’re very open with each other about their lives—but not so much about their thoughts! Hungarians tend to dislike confrontation so they usually act nice and polite in all situations, even if they don’t agree with something. This is because they don’t want to hurt or argue with others.

If you find yourself around locals for a longer period of time, you’ll start to notice these elements of Hungarian culture and etiquette yourself.

The Hungarian Flag against a White Background

2. Religion

Religion plays a rather large role in Hungarian culture and traditions. Hungary is a very religious nation, with nearly 70% of the population identifying as Roman Catholic.

This bond with Catholicism not only influences many Hungarian holidays, but is also reflected in the fact that many Hungarians are regular church-goers. However, more and more locals are ceasing to practice their religion and remain only informally tied to the Church through baptisms, funerals, or weddings.

You can find other indicators of Hungary’s religiousness in its cities. For example, in cities such as Eger, Esztergom, and Sopron, there are many beautiful, well-maintained, and regularly visited cathedrals. However, we should not forget the beautiful Saint Stephen’s Basilica or the Jewish synagogue on Dohány Street (the largest synagogue in all Europe!), both in the country’s capital city and real cultural center, Budapest.


The Bible, Holy Necklace with Christ Crucified Is Seen

3. Family

As we said earlier, Hungarian culture is very much centered around the family. Back in the day, Hungarian families were huge, consisting of several members. Nowadays, the average Hungarian family consists of the parents and one to three kids.

However, Hungarian family culture extends far beyond the nuclear family. Grandparents, cousins, and other relatives are just as valued—in fact, many grandparents share a household with their children and grandchildren, usually in their own separate little room. Consequently, it’s quite rare in Hungary to send older family members to nursing homes when they’re no longer able to live by themselves.

    → You can learn the Hungarian names of different family members on our Family vocabulary list!

A Family of Four Is Seen Smiling, Eating Ice-cream

4. Work

Hungarian business culture is rather strict. Everybody ‘knows their place’ and knows how to behave around certain people. The business etiquette and culture in Hungary are very much built on hierarchy. This is unlike the business cultures of some other countries, like Denmark for example, where everybody is equal and free to share their ideas about everything. While you can still share ideas in a Hungarian business meeting, you must do so within the framework of the hierarchy. 

Besides respecting hierarchy in the workplace, Hungarians are rather detail-oriented. They usually play by the rules and they like to stay in the know about everything that’s going on. For instance, business meetings and appointments should be scheduled way ahead of time—at least two weeks in advance—and the exact time, place, and duration of the meeting should be communicated to them as well. 

Punctuality is another top priority in Hungarian work culture. If you have to cancel a meeting, let your Hungarian partners know as soon as possible. If you forget to warn them far enough in advance, they may have a hard time forgiving you, resulting in workplace tension. 


5. Art

Hungarian music is probably the most famous art form in the country, with Hungarian folk and classical music being crucial parts of Hungarian history and culture. Hungarian folk music includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the twentieth century folk revival.

Regarding classical music, some of the most admired Hungarian composers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries include Ferenc Liszt, Béla Bartók, and Zoltán Kodály. Many skilled Hungarian painters lived during this same period. They include:

  • Pál Szinyei Merse (Lady in a Purple Dress; The Balloon)
  • Mihály Munkácsy (The Settlement of the Magyars in Hungary; Woman Carrying Firewood)
  • Bertalan Székely (Leda With Swan)

You can find many of their works in the Hungarian National Gallery.

If you’re thirsty for architecture, Hungary has plenty of buildings that will satisfy you. Just explore historical cities such as Eger, Sopron, Veszprém, and Szentendre. Even Budapest, the capital city of Hungary, bears the traces of Hungarian history and culture.

The Hands of a Pianist Is Seen Playing on a Piano

6. Food

Hungarian food and culture go hand in hand. But before you try any yourself, we must warn you that it’s pretty rich. However, this only means their cuisine will feed your soul just as much as your stomach, so don’t worry about putting on a few pounds during your stay.

You must know that Hungarians love their belly, so their meals are rich in fat, spices, meat, and bread. Also, they like their food spicy and full of Hungarian red paprika, which is the core of most Hungarian dishes. Other ingredients that Hungarians use often include dairy products—like tejföl, túró, and cheese—meat (mostly pork and chicken), and all kinds of seasonal vegetables grown in Hungary.

The signature Hungarian dish—which could even be considered a part of ancient Hungarian culture—is gulyás (“goulash”), which actually means “herdsman.” It is a thick soup that contains beef, pork fat, Hungarian red paprika (of course), onion, red wine, and lots of vegetables.

Another Hungarian specialty is lángos, which is deep-fried dough usually topped with garlic, tejföl (“sour cream”), and cheese.

Hungarians love their stomach, so they definitely like cooking! Keep your eyes peeled for our upcoming lesson on Hungarian foods, in which we’ll share a few popular and easy-to-make recipes for you to try at home.

A Big Pot of Gulyás, Red Pot with a Wooden Spoon in It

7. Traditional Holidays

There are several holidays that play a major role in Hungarian culture. Many of them reflect the religious nature of the country, while others have to do with the country’s history. Take a look at five of the most important Hungarian holidays. 

    → If you would like to learn even more about traditional Hungarian holidays, you can visit our Hungarian Holidays Archive to read up on individual holidays.
    → You can also learn what Hungarians call different Life Events in our relevant vocab list.

A- New Year’s Eve

On New Year’s Eve, there are usually lots of house parties, outdoor concerts, and programs that are organized by the government of Hungary. There are special programs on TV as well, usually old recordings from the 1990s called Sas Kabaré.

B- Memorial Day of the Revolution and Independence War in 1848

The Revolution of 1848 on March 15 is one of the most important events in Hungarian history and culture. During the Revolution, Hungarians fought for independence from the Habsburg Monarchy.

C- Easter

Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus and the upcoming spring. On this day, boys would traditionally ‘water’ girls with buckets of cold water! Nowadays, this tradition is still honored, mostly in the countryside. However, most Hungarians use perfume instead.

D- Saint Stephen’s Day

Saint Stephen’s Day is the National Foundation Day of Hungary on August 20. St. Stephen was the first Hungarian king and he brought Christianity to the Hungarian people.

E- Christmas

Christmas is the biggest holiday in Hungary. Families get together and celebrate not only the birth of Jesus Christ, but also family and love. They sit around a big table full of traditional Hungarian Christmas dishes such as stuffed cabbage, fisherman’s soup, and bejgli, and reminisce about the year that’s about to pass.

Budapest at Night, Fireworks Are Seen in Front of the Chain Bridge

8. How HungarianPod101.com Can Help You Learn More Hungarian

Now that you know the Hungarian culture a bit better, you can go to Hungary and experience it first-hand. However, if you would like to dive into the topic a bit more, we have several articles, vocabulary lists, and lessons that would be perfect for you. We linked to them throughout the page, but you can also explore our website and see what else you find there. 

At HungarianPod101.com, we deliver the best possible content for you so that you can maximize your learning potential while having fun.

If you would like to get more out of HungarianPod101, sign up now and study with us. When you join our tight-knit language learning family, you’ll be able to access tons of audio and video lessons, amongst many other exclusive features. 

If you still have any questions about Hungarian culture, don’t hesitate to ask us in the comments section. We’re always glad to help you out! 

Which aspect of Hungarian culture was the most interesting to you?

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Change in Hungary: 1848 Revolution Memorial Day

1848 was a time of forradalom (revolution), upheaval, and general discontent throughout Europe. Several different nations vied to achieve their unique political and social goals, and the Hungarian revolts of 1848 were particularly significant. 

In this article, you’ll learn about the 1848 Revolution of Hungary and how it’s commemorated today. Let’s get started!

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1. What is 1848 Revolution Memorial Day? 

A Cockade with Hungarian Flag Colors

The Hungarian Revolution of 1848 began on March 15, 1848, as Hungary followed the lead of many other European nations. Much of Europe was caught in a great upheaval during this time, with different nations trying to achieve varying—though similar—goals regarding the political and societal status of their people. Of all the 1848 revolutions in Europe, the one in Hungary lasted the longest and was arguably one of the most successful; the Hungarian uprising didn’t end until August 1849, when Austria employed the help of Russia.

For Hungary, the revolutions of 1848 largely focused on gaining autonomy from the Habsburg Monarchy and having its 12 Points of Demands met. These 12 Points, co-written by famous poet Petőfi Sándor (Sándor Petőfi), were read out by the nationalists throughout Pest on March 15.

A major leader of the revolution was Lajos Kossuth, often thought of as the face of the revolution. He was a radicalist who sought to have Hungary’s goals met in the fastest way possible, through any means necessary.

Hungary was successful toward the beginning, but the revolution ultimately failed after the Russian army came to Austria’s aid. However, the events of the revolution paved the way for Hungary to reach its goals later on. 


2. Celebrations and Key Events

The Hungarian Parliament Building

There are a few different celebrations and observances that take place to commemorate the 1848 Hungarian Revolution. If you happen to be walking the streets of Hungary, you’ll have the privilege of admiring the colors of the Hungarian flag all around you—the flag itself waving in front of buildings, people wearing red, white, and green clothing, and a few even donning kokárdák (cockades).

Most of the events for this holiday take place at Castle Hill and the Hungarian Parliament building. People gather at these locations to hear speeches from government leaders and to join in singing the National Song of Hungary. They can also see the raising of the Hungarian flag in Kossuth Square, and enter the Parliament and a variety of museums for free.

There are also plenty of kid- and family-friendly activities: guided horseback riding, folk music and dancing performances, theatrical performances, arts and crafts, fencing demonstrations, and more! If you plan on visiting, keep in mind that there will be plenty of restaurants open on this day, as well as food-tasting events you can experience. Those who get the day off may also enjoy a trip to the nearby Budapest Baths, where they can relax in the thermal baths and get a massage.  

    → Castle Hill and the Parliament Building are only two of the most popular locations in the country. Do you know of any other Tourist Attractions in Hungary?

3. More on Sándor Petőfi

A Man Clip Art

Sándor Petőfi may be best known for his major role in the 1848 Hungarian Revolution, though his poetry was well-loved at the time and the poet was known for his unique writing style. Today, he is the national poet of Hungary. In addition to co-writing the notorious 12 Points and penning the poem Nemzeti Dal, Petőfi crafted the National Song of Hungary and a number of other famous poems (such as John the Valiant). 

As for his personal life, Sándor Petőfi married a woman named Júlia Szendrey (also a poet, as well as a translator), and they had a son named Zoltán. He is thought to have died in one of the final battles of the revolution, though this has never been confirmed because his body was never found. 

4. Vocabulary to Know for 1848 Revolution Memorial Day

Black-and-White Depiction of Someone Standing Beside a Waving Flag

Ready to expand your Hungarian vocabulary? Then let’s review some of the words and phrases from this article, plus a few more! 

  • Szaval (Recite) – verb
  • Az 1848-as forradalom ünnepe (1848 Revolution Day) – proper noun
  • Petőfi Sándor (Sándor Petőfi) – proper noun
  • Forradalom (Revolution) – noun
  • Nemzeti Múzeum (National Museum) – proper noun
  • Kormány (Government) – noun
  • Harc (Combat) – noun
  • Kokárda (Cockade) – noun
  • Csata (Battle) – noun
  • Szabadságharc (War of independence) – noun
  • Nyomda (Press) – noun
  • Hadsereg (Army) – noun

To practice your pronunciation, be sure to visit our 1848 Revolution Day vocabulary list. It features audio recordings that you can listen to and repeat after! 

Final Thoughts

In this article, you learned about the revolutions of 1848, Hungary’s role in them, and more. The 1848 Hungarian Revolution may have been only one of many such revolutions of the time, but it was also one of the most significant. Though the revolutions did not end as hoped, it paved the way for Hungary’s later autonomy and independence. 

If you enjoyed this article and would like to learn more about Hungarian culture and holidays, we think you’ll like the following articles on HungarianPod101.com:

Thinking about learning the Hungarian language, or looking for the best place to continue your studies? We recommend:

It’s our goal to make every aspect of your language learning journey both effective and enjoyable, so we hope to see you around!

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Celebrating National Unity Day in Hungary

World War I wreaked havoc and wrought loss around the globe. Hungary, in particular, was very hard-hit come the end of the war, forced to muddle through life after a treaty her people deemed unfair.

In this article, you’ll learn about the Treaty of Trianon, traditions for National Unity Day in Hungary, and some useful vocabulary you should know.

Let’s get started.

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1. What is National Unity Day in Hungary?

The Day of National Unity, also known as the Memorial Day of the Treaty of Trianon, is a holiday to commemorate a great nemzeti tragédia (“national tragedy” ) that occured as a result of World War I. It’s also an opportunity to reflect on the unity that Hungary was still able to achieve in the face of disaster and igazságtalanság (“injustice” ).

What was the Treaty of Trianon?

The Treaty of Trianon was signed on June 4, 1920, and officially ended hostilities between Hungary and its enemies in World War I.

However, the Treaty of Trianon terms caused Hungary to területeket elveszít (“lose territories” ) on a massive scale; over seventy percent of Hungary’s territories were to be handed over to other countries. This resulted in beolvasztás (“forced assimilation” ), with approximately three-and-a-half million Hungarians forced to live under foreign control. Hungarians’ arguments against and concerns over this were ignored and neglected. In addition, Hungary was forced to cap its army at thirty-five thousand and could no longer have an air force or heavy weaponry.

For Hungary, the Treaty of Trianon was quite unfair; even today, there’s some bitterness over its terms.

    → Do you enjoy learning about history and geography? Check out our vocabulary lists on World Countries and Geography to sharpen your expertise in Hungarian!

2. When is National Unity Day?

The Hungarian Flag

In 2010, the Hungarian parliament announced June 4 as the Day of National Togetherness (Day of Unity).

3. National Unity Day Traditions and Observations

A Woman Holding a Sign that Says Defend Rights

In Hungary, National Unity Day is a time of nacionalizmus (“nationalism” ). All throughout the country, people commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Trianon and lay wreaths on the graves of those who lost their lives during the First World War.

In addition, there are many demonstrations held on this day to protest the treaty’s terms and call for change. Most Hungarians don’t approve of the treaty and the widespread injustices it caused. Even outside of the országhatár (“national border”), minority groups often protest for autonomy.

4. The Town of Loyalty

Sopron is often called the Town of Loyalty. Do you know why?

In December of 1921, a referendum was held to decide if Sopron should belong to Austria or Hungary. The People of Sopron chose to remain with Hungary, earning it its respectable title.

According to Wikipedia, Sopron is largely known for two things in modern times: excellent red and white wines, and affordable dental care. It’s also a large tourist center, with people from various countries often coming to visit here.

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for National Unity Day

Someone Reaching for a Chess Piece that’s Highlighted in Red

Let’s review some of the vocabulary words from this article!

  • Aláír — “Sign” [v.]
  • Megbüntet — “Punish” [v.]
  • Kisebbség — “Minority” [n.]
  • Igazságtalanság — “Injustice” [n.]
  • Első világháború — “First World War”
  • Nacionalizmus — “Nationalism” [n.]
  • Országhatár — “National border”
  • Feloszt — “Divide” [v.]
  • Küzd — “Struggle” [v.]
  • Legyőz — “Defeat” [v.]
  • Nemzeti tragédia — “National tragedy”
  • Területeket elveszít — “Lose territories” [v.]
  • Szomszédos ország — “Neighboring country”
  • Beolvasztás — “Forced assimilation”
  • Nemzeti összetartozás napja — “Day of National Unity”

If you want to hear the pronunciation of each word and phrase, be sure to visit our Hungarian Day of National Unity vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about the Day of National Unity, Hungary’s most common traditions to commemorate it, and new vocabulary to impress your Hungarian friends.

What are your thoughts on Hungary’s end of the deal concerning the Treaty of Trianon? Was your country involved in the First World War? Let us know in the comments; we love hearing from you!

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Gyermeknap: Celebrating Children’s Day in Hungary

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Do you remember being a kid? For me, any day off of iskola (“school”) was a treasure, and I would look forward to any and all vacations!

In Hungary, Children’s Day is a special occasion for every gyerek (“child”), a holiday set aside just for them. The importance of Children’s Day in Hungary can’t be overstated, as this is a time for parents and the general population to acknowledge children’s rights and make them feel loved.

In this article, you’ll learn about the origins of Children’s Day, Hungary’s typical celebrations and events for this holiday, and more.

Let’s get started.

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1. What is Children’s Day in Hungary?

A Group of Children Raising Their Hands

Originally, Hungary celebrated something called Children’s Week, beginning in 1931. However, since 1950, this is only a one-day holiday.

Like in other countries, the purpose of Children’s Day is to focus on the need for children’s rights, to shed light on the importance of children for the future, and to spend time with one’s own children. In Hungary, Children’s Day is often viewed as a perfect opportunity to educate children as well while they’re out and about with their parents and friends.

Children’s Day History

Children’s Day got its unofficial start in 1857, when Reverend Dr. Charles Leonard of Massachusetts gave a special sermon for and about children. Turkey was the first country to nationally declare Children’s Day a holiday, though; this happened several years later, in 1920. Nearly a decade later, Mustafa Atatürk (then-President of the Republic of Turkey) made this holiday official.

In 1950, this holiday began spreading to other countries, and today, approximately fifty countries hold some kind of Children’s Day celebration. Around this time, Children’s Day was largely a way of ensuring that children were treated properly, and according to their rights. There was also a focus on children’s general health and wellbeing.

The importance of Children’s Day has continued on even until today, though many parents also view this holiday as a time to just spoil their children!

2. When is Children’s Day?

Children’s Day is on a Sunday

Each year, Hungarians celebrate Children’s Day on the last Vasárnap (“Sunday”) of May. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years:

  • 2020: May 31
  • 2021: May 30
  • 2022: May 29
  • 2023: May 28
  • 2024: May 26
  • 2025: May 25
  • 2026: May 31
  • 2027: May 30
  • 2028: May 28
  • 2029: May 27

3. Children’s Day Celebrations in Hungary

Children Jumping Up in a Grassy Field

In larger cities like Budapest, there are numerous activities for Children’s Day going on, many of which are free to participate in for children under a certain age. For example, many scientific and historical museums have special programs or deals; other businesses may host entertaining educational events. Don’t be surprised to find bounce-houses in certain locations, either!

Many children like visiting the zoo, going out to eat at their favorite restaurant, and even just playing games at home if the weather is bad.

Regardless of a child’s interests, Children’s Day is a time to játszik (“play”) and enjoy time with one’s family. Many of the events we talked about are geared toward families, meaning that everyone can have some fun while celebrating Children’s Day!

4. Children’s Day at City Park

One of the most popular locations for families to spend the entire Children’s Day weekend is City Park in Budapest. Here, numerous activities take place, ensuring that there’s something for every child to enjoy!

While many of the events focus on educational topics such as science and culture, there are plenty of activities designed for pure fun, too. Puppet shows, dance performances, and a variety of games are just the tip of the iceberg. In 2019, a popular Hungarian Children’s Day attraction in City Park was a demonstration on horse therapy!

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for Children’s Day

A Kindergarten Class

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words from this lesson? Here are the most important words and phrases for Children’s Day in Hungary!

  • Vasárnap — “Sunday” [n.]
  • Gyerek — “Child” [n.]
  • Iskola — “School” [n.]
  • Lány — “Girl” [n.]
  • Fiú — “Boy” [n.]
  • Énekel — “Sing” [v.]
  • Gyermeknap — “Children’s Day” [n.]
  • Napközi — “Daycare” [n.]
  • Óvoda — “Kindergarten” [n.]
  • Játszik — “Play” [v.]
  • Változékony természetű — “Volatile”

To hear the pronunciation of each word, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Hungarian Children’s Day vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about Hungarian Children’s Day with us, and that you took away some valuable information about Hungarian culture.

Do you celebrate Children’s Day in your country? If so, what are celebrations like there? We look forward to hearing from you in the comments!

To continue learning about Hungarian culture and the language, check out these free articles on HungarianPod101.com:

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We look forward to having you! Happy Children’s Day! 🙂

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Nemzetközi nőnap: International Women’s Day in Hungary

Nemzetközi nőnap, or International Women’s Day in Hungary, is a special holiday set aside just for women. In Hungary, Women’s Day means lots of gift-giving and showing one’s appreciation for the most important women in one’s life. Every hölgy, or “lady,” enjoys receiving gifts and sweet wishes.

In this article, you’ll learn all about celebrating International Women’s Day in Hungary! Let’s get started.

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1. What is International Women’s Day?

Starting with the International Women’s Day history, this holiday can be traced back to 1909, when the Socailist Party of America organized an event for women in New York. This idea for a Women’s Day quickly spread to Europe, which had its first Women’s Day celebrations in 1911. In 1913, Hungary joined those countries where women are celebrated on this day, but the date became mandatory only in the Rákosi era, in 1948.

Each year on International Women’s Day, people show respect, admiration, and appreciation for the women in their life. The meaning behind Women’s Day varies slightly from one country to the next. For example, some countries have a greater focus on women’s achievements than others, and some focus more on promoting women’s rights.

In Hungary, many people have mixed feelings about International Women’s Day. Some people say that there’s no need to have a separate date to show our love and respect toward women, because these feelings aren’t only for one day. Others have a bitter taste in their mouth because of the communist background of this day, which is connected to labor movements.

If we are talking about Women’s Day, we should also mention that women in Hungary have been celebrated for centuries. Their day was March 25, the Day of the Annunciation. According to common belief, this was the day that Virgin Mary invited Jesus Christ into her womb. This Catholic celebration is about respect and appreciation for women, mothers, and fertility. Those who don’t like celebrating women on this day have a valid reason, saying Hungary has its own, centuries-old date to celebrate women, which is free of any political connotations.

    → HungarianPod101 has a vocabulary list on Religion if you want to learn more important words.

2. When is International Women’s Day?

A Woman Sitting at a Desk

Each year, International Women’s Day is celebrated on March 8.

3. How to Celebrate International Women Day

Woman Smelling a Bouquet of Flowers

In Hungary, Women’s Day traditions always involve gifting women with flowers and kind words. Men give these gifts to the most important women in their lives; women often find them waiting on their desk at work, and girls still in school may also find flowers on their school desk when they arrive!

One of the most popular International Women’s Day flowers in Hungary is the hóvirág, or “snowdrop,” which is labeled the messenger of spring. However, do be very careful when presenting a woman with snowdrops. Since 2005, buying and selling cut snowdrop flowers has been illegal. You can still offer snowdrops as a potted plant, though. Many women also enjoy receiving a tulipán, or “tulip.”

4. Men’s Day?

Do you know why there is no Men’s Day in Hungary?

When men complain about the lack of Men’s Day, they get the following answer from ladies: “The other 364 days of the year are already Men’s Day!”

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for International Women’s Day

A Single Snowdrop Flower

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words from this article? Here’s a list of the most important Hungarian words and phrases for International Women’s Day!

  • Gyönyörű — “Beautiful”
  • Hölgy — “Lady”
  • Szeret — “Love”
  • Tulipán — “Tulip”
  • — “Woman”
  • Férfi — “Man”
  • Virág — “Flower”
  • Nemzetközi nőnap — “International Women’s Day”
  • Ajándékoz — “Present”
  • Nemzetközi — “International”
  • Hóvirág — “Snowdrop”

To hear the pronunciation of each word, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Hungarian International Women’s Day vocabulary list.

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about International Women’s Day in Hungary with us. Do you celebrate Women’s Day in your country, or honor women another way? Let us know in the comments! We always love hearing from you.

If you’re fascinated with Hungarian culture and can’t get enough, be sure to check out the following pages on HungarianPod101.com:

Whatever your reasons for developing an interest in Hungarian culture or the beautiful language, know that HungarianPod101.com is the best way to expand your knowledge and improve your skills. With tons of fun, immersive lessons for learners at every level, there’s something for everyone!

Create your free lifetime account today, and start learning Hungarian with us.

Happy International Women’s Day from the HungarianPod101 family!

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Aranyvasárnap: Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sunday in Hungary

Purple, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sunday in Hungary

In Hungary, practicing Christians celebrate the four Sundays leading up to Christmas Eve. These are called the Purple, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sundays, originally known as the Advent Sundays.

In this article, you’ll learn all about this festive and deeply meaningful holiday, from its history to modern-day traditions for the Advent period. At HungarianPod101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your language-learning journey both fun and informative—starting with this article!

Let’s get started.

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1. What is Bronze, Silver, Gold Sunday?

Purple, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sunday are the four successive Sundays leading up to Christmas. These are not public holidays, but rather Christian holidays that have been commercialized and secularized over time.

For Christians, these are also known as the Advent Sundays. Because Sunday is a sacred day for Christians, those practicing the faith prepare for the grand Christmas Eve. celebration on each of the consecutive four Sundays. Many Hungarians also celebrate these holidays in a more secular fashion.

We’ll go more into traditions and celebrations later in this article.

2. When are the Advent Sundays?

Christmas Markets

The date of the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sundays are moveable, though they’re always the four Sundays before Christmas Eve.

Here’s the date of each of these Sundays:

Purple Bronze Silver Gold
2019 December 1 December 8 December 15 December 22
2020 November 29 December 6 December 13 December 20
2021 November 28 December 5 December 12 December 19
2022 November 27 December 4 December 11 December 18
2023 December 3 December 10 December 17 December 24
2024 December 1 December 8 December 15 December 22
2025 November 30 December 7 December 14 December 21
2026 November 29 December 6 December 13 December 20
2027 November 28 December 5 December 12 December 19
2028 December 3 December 10 December 17 December 24

3. Advent Traditions & Celebrations

For practicing Christians, the most important aspect of the Advent Sundays is attending the masses at church. However, as mentioned earlier, these holidays are gradually becoming more and more secularized—the eventual fate of many religious holidays.

While the core meaning of these Sundays—preparing to celebrate the birth of Jesus—remains mostly intact, many non-religious Hungarians celebrate them as well.

In particular, the Purple, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sundays have become associated with shopping and great deals! Like in the West, stores now offer huge promotions for these weekends, and thousands rush to shopping malls to take advantage of massive discounts and purchasing opportunities. There are also Christmas markets open, which sell special goods and treats for the holiday season!

Many Hungarians decorate their homes with the traditional Advent wreaths and Advent candles. On each Sunday of Advent leading to Christmas Eve., families light one candle until all four candles are lit on the fourth Sunday. Children love this tradition because, with each candle lit, they know that Christmas Eve. is nearer and they’re one week closer to opening their gifts from “Little Jesus” (Jézuska)!

Another popular tradition is the Advent calendar. Parents often give their children this Advent calendar at the beginning of the month, which contains one chocolate candy for each day of the Advent period. Sometimes, the treats for the Purple, Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sundays are larger or tastier than those for the rest of the days.

4. Why Purple, Bronze, Silver, and Gold?

The original names of these days were 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Sunday of Advent.

During the four decades of Communist dictatorship, authorities had a negative approach to churches and removed the religious connotations of all holidays and special days celebrated by the nation. It was then when these names were introduced.

Christmas was renamed as the “Pine Tree Feast.” The association with the precious metals bronze, silver, and gold refers to the gradual increase in importance toward the celebration.

Interestingly, the name Purple Sunday isn’t commonly known among Hungarians; perhaps this color is used because of its association with royalty or wealth.

5. Essential Vocabulary for the Advent Sundays

Hot Wine

Here’s some vocabulary you need to know for the Bronze, Silver, and Gold Sundays in Hungary!

  • Olcsó — “Cheap”
  • Pénzt költ — “Spend money”
  • Vásárlás — “Shopping
  • Árleszállítás — “Sale”
  • Piac — “Market”
  • Alkuldozik — “Bargain”
  • Választék — “Variety”
  • Meglepetés — “Surprise
  • Forralt bor — “Hot wine”
  • Tömeg — “Crowd”
  • bronz-, ezüst-,aranyvasárnap — “Bronze, Silver, Gold Sunday”

To hear the pronunciation of each vocabulary word, and read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Hungarian Bronze, Silver, Gold Sunday word list!

Final Thoughts

The four Sundays leading to Christmas Eve. are sacred, fun, and festive. Does your country have any special celebrations for Christmas or other winter holidays? Tell us about them in the comments section!

If you’re interested in learning more about Hungarian culture, or want to learn more words for the holidays and wintertime, you may find the following pages useful:

Learning Hungarian doesn’t have to be boring or overwhelming—with HungarianPod101.com, it can even be fun! We do everything we can to make language-learning both fun and effective, and in the process, introduce you to cultural insights and interesting facts!

If you’re serious about improving your Hungarian skills and broadening your knowledge of the country, create your free lifetime account today!

Happy Hungarian learning! 🙂

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St. Stephen of Hungary Feast Day Celebrations

Do you know the meaning of St. Stephen’s Day in Hungary? Really, there are two meanings. On St. Stephen’s Day, Hungary observes both:

  • A Christian holiday to celebrate St. Stephen, the first king of Hungary
  • A celebration commemorating Hungary’s 1000-year unbroken statehood

In this article, you’ll learn more about the long history behind the Feast Day of St. Stephen of Hungary, who is perhaps the most significant historical figure in the country. The effect that time and change can have on a country and its celebrations is truly fascinating, and at HungarianPod101.com, we hope to make this a fun and informative learning adventure!

By delving into the St. Stephen Feast Day, you’re opening yourself up to greater cultural understanding and historical knowledge, and this is a vital step in mastering any language. So let’s get started.

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1. What is St. Stephen’s Day?

First and foremost, St. Stephen Day is a Chrisitan holiday, and is one of the oldest holidays in Hungary. It commemorates the day almost a thousand years ago when St. Stephen I relics were canonized in the Basilica of Fehérvár. This is significant because St. Stephen I was Hungary’s first king and founded the Chrisitan Kingdom of Hungary, raising Hungary from the status of a nomadic tribe to a kingdom recognized among other European countries. Further, he created the Hungarian Christian Church and the first book of laws in Hungary.

While mainly a Christian holiday, St. Stephen Day has taken on other meanings over the years.

In particular, during the communist dictatorship of Hungary, the country was forced to abandon this holiday as a celebration of St. Stephen. Instead, the country’s current dictator founded another state: The People’s Republic of Hungary, announced on August 20, 1949. This day came to be known as Day of the Constitution, and was mixed in with the Soviet Union celebration of The Day of the New Bread. At this point, it was similar to the centuriesüold harvesting ceremonies, but is essentially unrelated.

In 1989, communism ended in Hungary and St. Stephen Day could once again be celebrated as the Christian and nationalistic holiday it began as.

2. St. Stephen’s Day Date

Hungarian Flag

Each year, Christians in Hungary celebrate St. Stephen Day on August 20. This is the date on which St. Stephen relics were canonized, and the date of the People’s Republic of Hungary being founded.

3. Traditions & Celebrations for St. Stephen’s Day

St. Stephen's Day Fireworks

Today, people all throughout Hungary celebrate St. Stephen Day. In Budapest, a mass takes place outside of the St. Stephen Basilica. Following this is the procession of the Holy Right, which is the mummified right hand of Stephen I, preserved since the 11th century.

However, the most spectacular St. Stephen Day celebration is the fireworks in Budapest, often watched from the river bank of Danube.

4. Firework Dangers

Unfortunately the aforementioned fireworks are not all about amusement. In 2006, there was a huge storm during the fireworks and five people lost their lives, and hundreds were injured when tens of thousands of people tried to escape the storm.

5. Vocabulary to Know for St. Stephen Day in Hungary

Lots of Bread

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for St. Stephen Day in Hungary!

  • Kenyér — “Bread”
  • Szent István napja -az államalapítás ünnepe — “St. Stephen Day”
  • Körmenet — “Procession”
  • Fehér kenyér — “White bread”
  • Szent István — “Saint Stephen”
  • Pogány — “Paganish”
  • Király — “King”
  • Magyar — “Hungarian”
  • Államalapítás — “Foundation of the state”
  • Tűzijáték — “Firework”
  • Szentté avat — “Canonize”

To hear of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our St. Stephen Day vocabulary list!

How HungarianPod101 Can Help You Master Hungarian

The St. Stephen’s Day holiday is a unique facet of Hungarian culture, colored by its history. What do you think of this Hungarian holiday? Is there a similar holiday in your own country? Tell us about it in the comments!

To continue learning about Hungarian culture and the language, explore HungarianPod101.com and take advantage of our numerous learning tools:

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How to Celebrate Mother’s Day in Hungary

Mother’s Day, celebrated in countries all over the world, is a day of showing love and appreciation for one’s mother or motherly figures. Traditions for Mother’s Day in Hungary vary in some ways from celebrations in your own country, though there are bound to be many similarities, too.

In Hungary, Mother’s Day is when you can expect to see little children giving their mothers handmade Mother’s Day gifts, Mother’s Day cards, or sweet-smelling lilacs. Maybe even while singing the words Orgona ága, barackfa virága (literally meaning “Organ Branch, Peach Tree Flower” ) to honor their beloved mothers.

By learning about how Hungary celebrates Mother’s Day, you’re both showing respect for the country of your target language, and giving yourself an opportunity to expand your understanding of the holiday itself. At HungarianPod101.com, we hope to make learning about Hungarian culture both fun and insightful! And we believe that learning about Mother’s Day in this country is both of those things.

Let’s get started!

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1. What is Mother’s Day in Hungary?

What day is Mother’s Day?

The tradition of celebrating mothers can be traced back to ancient Greece. In the early 20th century, America started celebrating Mother’s Day, and later more and more European countries joined.

Hungarians first celebrated mothers on the first Sunday of May in 1925. The celebration was organized by the Hungarian Red Cross Youth. The date was chosen to connect the occasion with the traditional cult of the Blessed Virgin service.

2. When is Mother’s Day?

Mother's Day is on a Sunday

The Mother’s Day date in Hungary varies from year to year, but is always the first Sunday in May. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

  • 2019: May 5
  • 2020: May 3
  • 2021: May 2
  • 2022: May 1
  • 2023: May 7
  • 2024: May 5
  • 2025: May 4
  • 2026: May 3
  • 2027: May 2
  • 2028: May 7

3. Reading Practice: How is Mother’s Day Celebrated?

Mother Receiving Gifts from Family

How is Mother’s Day in Hungary celebrated? Read the Hungarian text below to find out, and find the English translation directly below it.

Májusban minden óvoda és iskola tart kisebb-nagyobb anyák napi ünnepséget. A gyerekek sajátkezűleg készítenek rajzot, hajtogatnak virágot, vagy bármilyen egyszerűen elkészíthető kézműves ajándékot az édesanyjuknak. Ezeket versszavalás, ének kiséretében az anyák napi ünnepélyen adják át az anyukáknak. Ilyenkor a virágárusok nagy örömére a felnőttek is egy szál, vagy egy egész csokor virággal kedveskednek az anyukáknak, nagymamáknak és dédmamáknak.

Magyarországon az Anyák napi ünnepségek elképzelhetetlenek a május virága, az orgona nélkül. A botanikusok szerint az orgona az áhítatot jelképezi páratlan szépségével, friss és üde illatával, ezért az évek során méltó díszévé vált az ünnepnek. Az anyák napi köszöntő dalokban és versekben is sokszor megénekelték az orgonát, mint az Anyák napja virágát.

2013-ban egy babaápolási termékeket gyártó cég azzal lepte meg a szerencsés édesanyákat, hogy családjukat lefényképezte és személyes üzenet kíséretében, egy óriásplakáton megjelenítette. Természetesen az édesanyák nem tudtak erről az akciórol. Nagy volt a meglepetés, amikor meglátták a szeretteiket a hatalmas fényképen, amint boldog anyák napját kívánnak nekik.

In May, all schools and kindergartens organize a smaller Mother’s Day celebration. Children draw, make paper flowers with their own hands, or any easy-to-make artisan present for their mums. During the Mother’s Day celebration itself, they can give presents to their mothers while saying poems and singing songs. To make florists also happy, adults buy a flower or a bunch of flowers for their mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers.

In Hungary, there is no Mother’s Day celebration without the Flower of May: the lilac. Botanists say that the lilac symbolizes devotion with its special beauty and fresh, peachy aroma, so over time, it has become a worthy element of this festivity. Lilac, as the flower of Mother’s Day, is also a common theme of songs and poems written for this occasion.

In 2013, a company that makes baby care products surprised lucky mothers by taking pictures of their families. They put these pictures on giant posters with personal messages on them. Of course, the chosen mothers knew nothing about this occurrence. It was a big surprise when they saw the huge pictures on the street, on which their loved ones wished them a happy Mother’s Day.

4. Additional Information: Patron Saint

When it comes to Mother’s Day, Hungary even has a patron saint who may be attributed (at least partially) with its desire to celebrate mothers.

Do you know who the patron saint of Hungary is?
The patron saint of Hungary is the mother of Jesus, the Virgin Mary. Even the first Hungarian Mother’s Day in 1925 was in connection with the old cult of Mary in May.

5. Must-know Vocab

Gift Certificate

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Mother’s Day in Hungary!

  • Vasárnap — “Sunday”
  • Fia — “son”
  • Lánya — “daughter”
  • Nagymama — “grandmother”
  • Anya — “mother”
  • Csokoládé — “chocolate
  • Vacsora — “dinner
  • Rózsa — “rose”
  • Szeret — “love”
  • Ajándék — “present”
  • Anyák napja — “Mother’s Day”
  • Üdvözlőkártya — “greeting card”
  • Ünnepel — “celebrate”
  • ágyban reggeli — “breakfast in bed”
  • Ajándékutalvány — “gift certificate”
  • Szülő — “parent”

To hear the pronunciation of each Hungarian Mother’s Day vocabulary word, check out our relevant vocabulary list. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed learning about how Hungarians celebrate Mother’s Day. Are Mother’s Day celebrations and traditions similar in your own country, or different? Let us know in the comments!

To learn more about Hungarian culture and the language, visit us at HungarianPod101.com. We provide our students with insightful blog posts on numerous topics, free vocabulary lists for a fuller word knowledge, and an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow Hungarian learners! By upgrading to Premium Plus, you can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program and learn Hungarian one-on-one with your own personal teacher.

Wherever you are on your language-learning journey, and wherever you want to be, know that your hard work will pay off! You’ll be speaking Hungarian like a native before you know it. And HungarianPod101.com will be here with all the study materials and support you need to get there!

Until next time, Happy Mother’s Day!

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How to Say Happy New Year in Hungarian & New Year Wishes

Learn all the Hungarian New Year wishes online, in your own time, on any device! Join HungarianPod101 for a special Hungarian New Year celebration!

How to Say Happy New Year in Hungarian

Can you relate to the year passing something like this: “January, February, March – December!”? Many people do! Quantum physics teaches us that time is relative, and few experiences illustrate this principle as perfectly as when we reach the end of a year. To most of us, it feels like the old one has passed in the blink of an eye, while the new year lies ahead like a very long journey! However, New Year is also a time to celebrate beginnings, and to say goodbye to what has passed. This is true in every culture, no matter when New Year is celebrated.

So, how do you say Happy New Year in Hungarian? Let a native teach you! At HungarianPod101, you will learn how to correctly greet your friends over New Year, and wish them well with these Hungarian New Year wishes!

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Table of Contents

  1. How to Celebrate New Year in Hungary
  2. Must-Know Hungarian Words & Phrases for the New Year!
  3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions in Hungarian
  4. Inspirational New Year Quotes
  5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes
  6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages
  7. How HungarianPod101 Can Help You Learn Hungarian

But let’s start with some vocabulary for Hungarian New Year celebrations, very handy for conversations.

1. How to Celebrate New Year in Hungary

Let’s discuss a few examples of Hungarian traditions and rituals related to New Year’s Eve, called the Day of Sylvester or szilveszter. This is a time of relaxation after the intimate Christmas holiday, which is usually celebrated within the family. Do you have the chilled bubbly in the fridge? Is the traditional lentil soup ready? Ok, then let’s get on with it!

While we’re on the topic of lentils, do you know the answer to this question?

What is the secret behind the tradition of eating lentils – lencse on New Year’s Day?

If you don’t already know, you’ll find out a bit later. Keep reading.

December 31 is the last day of the year, and in Hungary, it is the name-day of people called Sylvester. People start preparations during the afternoon of the 31st for the New Year’s Eve celebrations that are held that night. Trumpets, horns, confetti and fireworks vendors all line the streets, making it quite the festive atmosphere. Most people go to house parties, but lots of restaurants also offer New Year’s parties as well. When the clock strikes 12, everybody remains quiet and stands at attention while listening to the Hungarian National Anthem, in Hungarian Magyar Himnusz.

Moving on from the modern New Year’s parties of the cities, let’s take a look at what goes on in the countryside to learn something about traditional customs aimed at bringing good health, wealth, happiness and good luck to the next year. On New Year’s Day in Hungary, one is not allowed to eat poultry and fish. This is because of the local belief that chickens bury our good luck and fish will swim away with it. In contrast, pigs dig the luck out, so eating pork on New Year’s is thought to bring you good luck for the rest of the year. Taking out or throwing anything from the house away is also thought to bring bad luck, because wealth and good luck are believed to leave the house along with it. Even throwing out trash is forbidden! Strudel or rétes is typically baked as well, because the dish is associated with a life as long as the stretched sheets of strudel dough.

When it comes to good luck and happiness for the new year, Hungarians do not leave anything to chance. Another thing they do for the sake of good luck is give small gifts to each other that are thought to bring good luck to the receiver of the gift. Four-leaf clovers are well-known as charms for good luck, as well as the so called “good-luck piglet.” Chimney-sweepers are also believed to sweep bad luck out of one’s life. If one has done all the above-mentioned tasks, there is nothing left to stop the coming of a perfect New Year! In Hungarian, I wish you Happy New Year is Boldog új évet kívánok! – or as abbreviated in Hungarian, “B.ú.é.k.!”

But beware! In Hungary, use of fireworks, or tűzijátékok, and fire crackers, or petárdák, is only permitted during New Year’s Eve; using such devices at any other time is illegal, and heavy penalties may apply!

Now it’s time to answer our quiz question-

What is the secret behind the tradition of eating lentils on New Year’s Day?

The shape of the lentil – in accordance with traditional beliefs – is also the symbol of money. It is thought that the more lentils you eat on New Year’s Day, the richer you will become in the coming year.

Happy New Year!
Boldog új évet!

2. Must-Know Hungarian Words & Phrases for the New Year!

Hungarian Words & Phrases for the New Year

1- Year

év

This is pretty self-explanatory. Most countries follow a Gregorian calendar, which has approximately 365 days in a year, while in some cultures, other year designations are also honored. Therefore, New Year’s day in Hungary could fall on a different day than in your country. When do you celebrate New Year?

2- Midnight

éjfél

The point in time when a day ends and a new one starts. Many New Year celebrants prefer to stay awake till midnight, and greet the new annum as it breaks with fanfare and fireworks!

3- New Year’s Day

újév

In most countries, the new year is celebrated for one whole day. On the Gregorian calendar, this falls on January 1st. On this day, different cultures engage in festive activities, like parties, parades, big meals with families and many more.

You can do it!

4- Party

buli

A party is most people’s favorite way to end the old year, and charge festively into the new one! We celebrate all we accomplished in the old year, and joyfully anticipate what lies ahead.

5- Dancing

táncolás

Usually, when the clock strikes midnight and the New Year officially begins, people break out in dance! It is a jolly way to express a celebratory mood with good expectations for the year ahead. Also, perhaps, that the old year with its problems has finally passed! Dance parties are also a popular way to spend New Year’s Eve in many places.

6- Champagne

pezsgő

Originating in France, champagne is a bubbly, alcoholic drink that is often used to toast something or someone during celebrations.

7- Fireworks

tűzijáték

These are explosives that cause spectacular effects when ignited. They are popular for announcing the start of the new year with loud noises and colorful displays! In some countries, fireworks are set off to scare away evil spirits. In others, the use of fireworks is forbidden in urban areas due to their harmful effect on pets. Most animals’ hearing is much more sensitive than humans’, so this noisy display can be very frightful and traumatising to them.

Happy Near Year!

8- Countdown

visszaszámlálás

This countdown refers to New Year celebrants counting the seconds, usually backward, till midnight, when New Year starts – a great group activity that doesn’t scare animals, and involves a lot of joyful shouting when the clock strikes midnight!

9- New Year’s Holiday

Újévi ünnep

In many countries, New Year’s Day is a public holiday – to recuperate from the party the previous night, perhaps! Families also like to meet on this day to enjoy a meal and spend time together.

10- Confetti

konfetti

In most Western countries, confetti is traditionally associated with weddings, but often it is used as a party decoration. Some prefer to throw it in the air at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

11- New Year’s Eve

Szilveszter

This is the evening before New Year breaks at midnight! Often, friends and family meet for a party or meal the evening before, sometimes engaging in year-end rituals. How are you planning to give your New Year greetings in 2018?

12- Toast

pohárköszöntő

A toast is a type of group-salutation that involves raising your glass to drink with others in honor of something or someone. A toast to the new year is definitely in order!

13- Resolution

fogadalom

Those goals or intentions you hope to, but seldom keep in the new year! Many people consider the start of a new year to be the opportune time for making changes or plans. Resolutions are those intentions to change, or the plans. It’s best to keep your resolutions realistic so as not to disappoint yourself!

14- Parade

felvonulás

New Year celebrations are a huge deal in some countries! Parades are held in the streets, often to celebratory music, with colorful costumes and lots of dancing. Parades are like marches, only less formal and way more fun. At HungarianPod101, you can engage in forums with natives who can tell you what Hungarian New Year celebrations are like!

3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions

New Year’s Resolutions List

So, you learned the Hungarian word for ‘resolution’. Fabulous! Resolutions are those goals and intentions that we hope to manifest in the year that lies ahead. The beginning of a new year serves as a good marker in time to formalise these. Some like to do it in writing, others only hold these resolutions in their hearts. Here are our Top 10 New Year’s resolutions at HungarianPod101 – what are yours?

Learn these phrases and impress your Hungarian friends with your vocabulary.

New Year's Resolutions

1- Read more

Többet olvas.

Reading is a fantastic skill that everyone can benefit from. You’re a business person? Apparently, successful business men and women read up to 60 books a year. This probably excludes fiction, so better scan your library or Amazon for the top business reads if you plan to follow in the footsteps of the successful! Otherwise, why not make it your resolution to read more Hungarian in the new year? You will be surprised by how much this will improve your Hungarian language skills!

2- Spend more time with family

Több időt tölt a családdal.

Former US President George Bush’s wife, Barbara Bush, was quoted as having said this: “At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict, or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, a parent.” This is very true! Relationships are often what gives life meaning, so this is a worthy resolution for any year.

3- Lose weight

Lefogy.

Hands up, how many of you made this new year’s resolution last year too…?! This is a notoriously difficult goal to keep, as it takes a lot of self discipline not to eat unhealthily. Good luck with this one, and avoid unhealthy fad diets!

4- Save money

Pénzt megtakarít.

Another common and difficult resolution! However, no one has ever been sorry when they saved towards reaching a goal. Make it your resolution to save money to upgrade your subscription to HungarianPod101’s Premium PLUS option in the new year – it will be money well spent!

5- Quit smoking

Abbahagyja a dohányzást.

This is a resolution that you should definitely keep, or your body could punish you severely later! Smoking is a harmful habit with many hazardous effects on your health. Do everything in your power to make this resolution come true in the new year, as your health is your most precious asset.

6- Learn something new

Valamit újat tanul.

Science has proven that learning new skills can help keep brain diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay! It can even slow down the progression of the disease. So, keep your brain healthy by learning to speak a new language, studying towards a qualification, learning how to sew, or how to play chess – no matter how old you are, the possibilities are infinite!

7- Drink less

Kevesebbet iszik.

This is another health resolution that is good to heed any time of the year. Excessive drinking is associated with many diseases, and its effect can be very detrimental to good relationships too. Alcohol is a poison and harmful for the body in large quantities!

8- Exercise regularly

Rendszeresen mozog.

This resolution goes hand-in-hand with ‘Lose weight’! An inactive body is an unhealthy and often overweight one, so give this resolution priority in the new year.

9- Eat healthy

Egészségesen étkezik.

If you stick with this resolution, you will lose weight and feel better in general. It is a very worthy goal to have!

10- Study Hungarian with HungarianPod101

Magyarul tanulni a HungarianPod101.com oldalával

Of course! You can only benefit from learning Hungarian, especially with us! Learning how to speak Hungarian can keep your brain healthy, it can widen your circle of friends, and improve your chances to land a dream job anywhere in the world. HungarianPod101 makes it easy and enjoyable for you to stick to this resolution.

4. Inspirational New Year Quotes

Inspirational Quotes

Everyone knows that it is sometimes very hard to stick to resolutions, and not only over New Year. The reasons for this vary from person to person, but all of us need inspiration every now and then! A good way to remain motivated is to keep inspirational quotes near as reminders that it’s up to us to reach our goals.

Click here for quotes that will also work well in a card for a special Hungarian new year greeting!

Make decorative notes of these in Hungarian, and keep them close! Perhaps you could stick them above your bathroom mirror, or on your study’s wall. This way you not only get to read Hungarian incidentally, but also remain inspired to reach your goals! Imagine feeling like giving up on a goal, but reading this quote when you go to the bathroom: “It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.” What a positive affirmation!

5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes

Language Learning Quotes

Still undecided whether you should enroll with HungarianPod101 to learn a new language? There’s no time like the present to decide! Let the following Language Learning Quotes inspire you with their wisdom.

Click here to read the most inspirational Language Learning Quotes!

As legendary President Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.” So, learning how to say Happy New Year in Hungarian could well be a way into someone special’s heart for you! Let this year be the one where you to learn how to say Happy New Year, and much more, in Hungarian – it could open many and unexpected doors for you.

6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages

Here’s a lovely bonus for you! Why stop with Hungarian – learn how to say Happy New Year in 31 other languages too! Watch this video and learn how to pronounce these New Year’s wishes like a native in under two minutes.

7. Why Enrolling with HungarianPod101 Would Be the Perfect New Year’s Gift to Yourself!

If you are unsure how to celebrate the New Year, why not give yourself a huge gift, and enroll to learn Hungarian! With more than 12 years of experience behind us, we know that HungarianPod101 would be the perfect fit for you. There are so many reasons for this!

Learning Paths

  • Custom-tailored Learning Paths: Start learning Hungarian at the level that you are. We have numerous Learning Pathways, and we tailor them just for you based on your goals and interests! What a boon!
  • Marked Progress and Fresh Learning Material Every Week: We make new lessons available every week, with an option to track your progress. Topics are culturally appropriate and useful, such as “Learning how to deliver negative answers politely to a business partner.” Our aim is to equip you with Hungarian that makes sense!
  • Multiple Learning Tools: Learn in fun, easy ways with resources such 1,000+ video and audio lessons, flashcards, detailed PDF downloads, and mobile apps suitable for multiple devices!
  • Fast Track Learning Option: If you’re serious about fast-tracking your learning, Premium Plus would be the perfect way to go! Enjoy perks such as personalised lessons with ongoing guidance from your own, native-speaking teacher, and one-on-one learning on your mobile app! You will not be alone in your learning. Weekly assignments with non-stop feedback, answers and corrections will ensure speedy progress.
  • Fun and Easy: Keeping the lessons fun and easy-to-learn is our aim, so you will stay motivated by your progress!

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There’s no reason not to go big in 2018 by learning Hungarian with HungarianPod101. Just imagine how the world can open up for you!